Shark Attack Case Study

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Shark Attack Case Study

1. Five Organ Systems: Cardiovascular System, Integumentary System, Muscular System, Nervous System, Skeletal System 2. Damaged Bone: Humerus Damaged Muscles: Brachialis, Brachioradialis, Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Deltoid muscle 3. Importance of a clean bite: Most of the tissue and bone that was injured during the attack would still be intact and have a greater replantation rate then bone and tissues that are jagged or shredded. The infection risk would be lower for the victim and the severed limb; this would allow a faster healing time for both the limb and the victim with minimal scarring for the tissue and skin. 4. Shortening of a bone: Shortening of the bone will simplify the repair of the nerves and blood vessels which makes it possible for the single suture of an artery, vein, and/or nerve as necessary. It also allows for the soft tissue on either side of the bone easier to put together. 5. Movements associated with arm, forearm, wrist, and fingers: a. Shoulder: flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, external and internal rotation b. Elbow: flexion and extension c. Forearm: pronation and supination

d. Wrist: flexion, extension, ulnar and radial deviation e. Fingers: MCP – flexion, extension, abduction and adduction/ IP: flexion and extension 6. Movements may be altered after reattachment: Nervous system may regenerate under the right conditions, but the muscles may not be able to function as they did prior to detachment. During surgery, the muscles may not connect well which will alter some movements the arm would try to produce. As the victim ages, he may begin to notice the differences in strength in both arms. The right arm’s bicep, tricep, and deltoid muscles will be least likely to flex and extend properly while lifting weight, doing push-ups, or even throwing objects like a baseball. The muscles may struggle while doing activities involving supination and pronation...
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