Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day by William Shakespeare

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"Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" by William Shakespeare… [pic]

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

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In the opening section, shakespeare asks the question whether the woman he loves is more beautifull than a summer's day. he answers by writting that that she is atbetter because summer doesn't last year long. Then he describes the sun as the eye of heaven and the beauty but comparing to his love shakespeare finds problems in the sun he saes that the sun to he ERRORS eg. sometimes it losses its complexion , goes too hot, he latter states thatevery thing will lose its beauty becausse nature removes it.But he uses hberbole to explain the beuat of his lover he states it everlasting summer and the beauty that even death cn't take away. Shakespeare now tell his porpuse of writting down the sonnet as to until man will breath this poem will breath and complement the beauty of his love. Sarim Shamir PAKISTAN

| Posted on 2008-10-23 | by a guest

.: :.

In the opening section, shakespeare asks the question whether the woman he loves is more beautifull than a summer's day. he answers by writting that that she is atbetter because summer doesn't last year long. Then he describes the sun as the eye of heaven and the beauty but comparing to his love shakespeare finds problems in the sun he saes that the sun to he ERRORS eg. sometimes it losses its complexion , goes too hot, he latter states thatevery thing will lose its beauty becausse nature removes it.But he uses hberbole to explain the beuat of his lover he states it everlasting summer and the beauty that even death cn't take away. Shakespeare now tell his porpuse of writting down the sonnet as to until man will breath this poem will breath and complement the beauty of his love.

| Posted on 2008-10-23 | by a guest

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KT writes that the poem is to a man because it says "and often is his gold complexion dimm'd". The "he" the verse refers to, is the sun (the eye of heaven), introduced in the previous verse. Most scholars seem to agree that the object of all this affection is a man, but does it really matter? The strength and worth of his feeling would be the same. I also have to point out that both sonnet xvii and xix concludes in similar ways, and that he doesn't necessarily intends to brag about his future popularity - what Shakespeare states, is that the beauty of the beloved is preserved within the poem, and will stay that way for as long as anyone will be able to read it, not that people WILL read it. - Renate

| Posted on 2008-10-13 | by a guest

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This sonnet is not about Shakespeare's love for a woman. It is about a young man. He clearly states that "His gold complexion dimmed, / And every fair from fair sometime declines" he is talking about man. Romantic love is not likely what Shakespeare intended by writing this poem. If anything it is a chance for Shakespeare to brag how good a writer he is. He says that he is such a good writer that this man will be kept alive through his poem because he believes people will read it forever. "So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, / So long lives this, and this gives life to thee" "This" being the poem. And the best part about it is that Shakespeare is right. The young man is still alive because of his poem. -KT.

| Posted on 2008-09-29 | by a guest

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The language of the poem is obvious...
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