Shakespeare Quotes

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Romeo & Juliet - Act Three Notes
Scene one

Central Developments:
1. This is a pivotal scene in the play. From this point forward the action accelerates toward the catastrophe surrounding the tragedy of Romeo & Juliet’s death. 2. The scene opens with the fateful meeting in the street of Tybalt and Mercutio. Each of these characters are hot-headed and ready for a fight. 3. Benvolio again attempts to be a peace maker but is ineffective. 4. Romeo does not want to become involved in a fight with Tybalt because they are now kinsman. 5. Romeo’s fateful intervention allows Tybalt to mortally wound Mercutio. 6. In response to Mercutio’s death Romeo feels guilty and ashamed because he did not fight for his family’s honor and allowed his best friend to be killed. 7. Romeo is banished; here audiences see tragic irony as the marriage between Romeo and Juliet which was hoped to end the feud has instead separated the lovers. 8. The Capulet’s call for vengeance asking for Romeo’s death – this reveals the feud continues.

Themes: Fate vs. Human Responsibility, Passion vs. Reason

Important Quotes:

Line 65-69
Line 86
Line 98-99
Line 115-116
Line 132
Line 190-191

Romeo & Juliet - Act Three Notes
Scene Two
Central Developments:
1. Juliet’s opening words express anxious anticipation of her wedding night. She is eager for the consummation of her marriage, though innocent of physical love. Her speech suggests both a deep passion for Romeo and the over-excitement of a child. 2. Frequent references to the stars and night in Juliet’s opening speech ironically reinforce the theme of fate (“Star-crossed lovers”) 3. The audience feels deep pity (pathos) for Juliet, whi is emotionally shattered by the nurse’s twisted story of the events between Romeo and Tybalt. 4. The nurse once again acts to help bring the lovers together – theme of fate vs. human responsibility 5. Juliet’s closing comments “…I’ll to my wedding-bed; and death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead!” (136-137) mirror Romeo’s ominous references to death before the Capulet ball and foreshadow the dark events ahead.

Themes: Fate vs. Human Responsibility

Important Quotes:
Line 5-7
Line 26-28
Line 40
Line 69-70
Line 73-79
Line 97-99
Line 136-137

Romeo & Juliet - Act Three Notes
Scene Three
Central Developments:
1. As was Juliet in the previous scene, Romeo is deeply distraught by the thought of separation from his love. 2. Friar Laurence seeks to lift Romeo from his state of melancholy, offering advice rooted in reason. The Friar is not only confessor and counselor, but also surrogate father. 3. Romeo’s words and actions suggest both deep passion and the rashness of youth. 4. Despite his wise counsel, the Friar gives in to Romeo’s emotions and send him to see Juliet. 5. The Friar arranges a plan, which he hopes will provide a happy ending – theme of fate vs. human responsibility. Here the question of whether the Friar is an agent of fate of partially responsible for the final catastrophe arises.

Themes: Fate vs. Human Responsibility, Reason vs Passion, Age vs. Youth, Family loyalty

Important Quotes:
Line 12-14
Line 64-70
Line 108-111
Scene Four
Central Developments:
1. Paris’s suit, mentioned in Act 1, is re-introduced. Another threat to Romeo and Juliet’s union and love surfaces. 2. The character of old Capulet changes. He is forceful and direct, the obvious ruler in his household. This is a sharp contrast to the genial host at the ball in Act 1, Scene 5. 3. Capulet no longer seems concerned that a suitor should have Juliet’s heart of that her will is important. Themes: Arranged Marriages, Parental Authority, Age vs. Youth Important Quotes:

Line 3-4
Line 13-14
Line 20-21
Romeo & Juliet - Act Three Notes
Scene Five
Central Developments:
1. The tender, yet painful, parting of Romeo and Juliet takes place with the ominous...
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