Shakespeare Poem Analysis

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This sonnet that Shakespeare had written is pretty complex and at the same time interesting, because there are many to analysis and meaningful. The literary devices in the sonnet make it so intense and interesting. This sonnet is about love in its most great thing and is glories and how lovers came to each other generously, and get into a relationship found in trusts. Shakespeare does a great job at grabbing the interest by using the rhythm, and the hidden meaning of how love is great. As this poem is a sonnet it has a rhythm as we read it. There are few words repeats in the line, “love is not love,” and “remover to remove,” they helps to makes the flow of the rhythm too. “Love’s not time’s fool,” Shakespeare used personification which made an image of time being fool and that line means love is not trick of time. “Rosy lips and cheek,” in that line he had described beauty of women. He also used onomatopoeia, “O no!” There is alliteration, “compass come.” This poetic and literary technique makes the audiences have pleasure at reading. The poet introduces what love is. Shakespeare wrote that love is stable and strong, and will not "alter when it alteration finds." This following line states that true love is indeed an "ever-fix'd mark" and “looks tempests and is never shaken” which means lovers mind would never change and love would guide people like a lighthouse and the North Star. The quality of using the metaphorical language to describe love is really powerful. In the other line, “It is the star to every wandering bark, whose worth's unknown, although his height is taken,” claims that they can measure love to some degree, but this doesn't mean we understand it fully. The line, “ev’n to the edge of doom”, the last day of life or death; shows again the wonderful nature of love that is stable throughout time and remains evermore. By these descriptions we could understand the love how Shakespeare views what love is.
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