Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

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Heads resting on hands, slowing sliding to the desktops. Eyelids fighting to stay open, while other eyes follow each word, as they are read aloud. Some students gaze at the pages, but daydream and never really look at what is on the paper in front of them. Meanwhile, others hide cell-phones, as fingers are quickly texting away. This is a typical day in school, as the students in the English class are struggling to pay attention. The teacher recites the lines from Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo and Juliet, but to most of the students, the words go in one ear and out the other, resembling the voice of Charlie Brown’s teacher. Shakespeare’s work has been around for centuries and has had a great impact on literature. Sure Shakespeare is no High School Musical modern, love-story, but Romeo and Juliet is a tale of two young lovers, who take their lives to be together. Back in the day, it was the most popular play, which everyone today has heard about one way or another. However, along with time comes change and although Shakespeare’s original intent for his writing was to be performed, it was eventually written in books, and made into multiple versions of motion pictures. So with all of these resources and students are always trying to find ways to be entertained, out of books, movies, and theatre, the best way to learn is obvious, and that is through the theatre, Shakespeare’s original intent.

The most common way every student first learns about Shakespeare’s classic Romeo and Juliet, is through the hard text, a book. It is one of the easiest materials for teachers to get ahold of, and Shakespeare’s work can always be found throughout an English textbook. Although it is one of the most boring ways to enjoy his great work, it is the best way to get a sense of culture. Since it is written in Early Modern English, students can get the feel for how proper people were back in the late 1500s. The words are written in poetic inversion and, at first, are hard to...
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