Sexual Harassment

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Stephanie Garcia
HRTM 134
Mid-term Research Paper
Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is an issue dealt on a daily basis in the hospitality industry. Sexual harassment can be defined as the unsolicited sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature in a work place. As a result, sexual harassment can be divided into two categories: “quid pro quo” and “hostile work environment”. Furthermore, same-sex harassment has also gained popularity, yet it still remains a delicate issue to go about. It is important to recognize and dissolve a hostile work environment; in addition, due to increasing cases of same-sex harassment, new preventive measures should be implemented in the work place. Brief Literature Review:

Sexual harassment is a re-occurring issue in the work environment. As women began to join the workforce during the 1930’s, sexual harassment began to surface. Yet, it was not until the 1960’s that sexual harassment became a serious enough issue for the U.S. government to interfere. In 1964 a law was enacted in order to prosecute those who violated such conduct in the work environment. Furthermore, as modern society advances, and people become open minded, same-sex harassment becomes a tricky issue.

It is important to recognize this issue, since it is a common problem in the work place. Consequently, its also important to know how to resolve this matter as well.

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Case Study:
Sexual harassment can be constituted as unwelcome verbal or physical actions of a sexual nature. Consequently, sexual harassment can be divided into two groups: “quid pro quo” and “hostile work environment”. Proceeding from Latin, quid pro quo refers to the saying “something for something”. Moreover, quid pro quo comprises as “harassment when a submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment decisions” (Health & Safety). Quid pro quo refers to a sexual conduct that could potentially lead to benefiting or hindering a worker’s performance based on a conditional compliance. Furthermore, “hostile work environment” takes place when the action has “the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment” (Health & Safety). This refers to an employee harassing a co-worker to the extent that it interferes with the worker’s performance. In short, sexual harassment can be classified into two groups depending on the type of situation in which this issue manifests itself. During the 1930’s women fought for their right to equality. In western civilization “women were viewed as subservient to men. For centuries, women were considered less intelligent and less capable, less principled and moral and more childlike than men” (Where to Draw the Line pg 41). Such beliefs contributed to women’s inequality in the United States at the time. As women began to enter the workforce, sexual harassment began to emerge. Yet, it was not until the 1960’s that the United States government began to interfere in this issue, “Civil Rights Act of 1964 was enacted banning job discrimination based ob sex” (Where to Draw the Line pg 41). Continuing the history of Garcia 3

sexual harassment, “in 1975, the first reported sexual harassment was made; two women claimed they suffered repeated verbal and physical advances from a supervisor. An Arizona federal district court ruled the act did not cover such a claim” (Where to draw the Line pg 41). As illustrated, although sexual harassment did have criminal punishment, it was still taken lightly among the work place. Moreover, the following years sexual harassment gained popularity, therefore it was beginning to be taken more serious “in 1977, the federal appeals court in Washington ruled that sexual harassment is discrimination under the Civil Rights Act” (Where to Draw the Line pg 41). Finally, sexual...
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