Sexual Addiction: a Generation's Pandemic

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 37
  • Published : May 3, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Sexual Addiction: a Generation’s Pandemic
The 21st century positions the Sex Industry as one of the leading and fastest growing industries, so to say that sexual addiction is one of the widest and fastest spreading pandemics falls not short of claim. Sexual addiction does not pertain necessarily to the addiction of sexual intercourse but includes the excessive use of Internet pornography, increased sexual behavior and hyper sexuality. Sexual addicts have been constantly labeled as ‘freaks’, pedophiles, ‘weirdoes’, or in extreme cases rapists. Not only is the media responsible for the outcast of sexual addicts but also for making any individual/business associated with the sex industry (i.e. employees of sex associated companies, escorts, adult stores, etc.…) ashamed to speak of whom they are or what they do for a living. The sources will help identify sexual addiction from a clinical and scientific vantage point. Statistical information from the sources will provide liable data on the associated consequences. Real life scenarios will shed light on what goes on in the lives of these addicts.

Sexual addiction is without doubt taking hold of our current, past, and forthcoming generations. The addiction of men, mainly, leads not only to societal compulsive behaviors but also to dysfunctional marriages, divorce and in extreme cases rape. The addiction epidemic is growing and becoming diverse with the introduction of new technologies. Technological advancements promise ‘life-like’ sexual pleasures through 3D and UHD monitors. Being placed as abjects within society and often labeled, sexual addicts find a hard time coping with themselves and their environments.

In “Sexual Addictions,” Frederico Duarte Garcia and Florence Thibaut clarify the definition of excessive nonparaphilic sexual behavior. The article gives a brief history of the topic and explains excessive sexual behavior from two standpoints, Obsessive-Compulsive Hypothesis, and Impulsive-Control Disorder Hypothesis. They finally conclude that “sexual addiction appears to include the core element of addiction proposed by Potenza et.al” (Duarte Garcia and Thibaut 256), rather than a compulsive or impulsive disorder. The article clearly states that sexual addiction is very similar to a chemical or substance addiction. In Potenza’s study of the subjects, 98% of them reported withdrawal symptoms when sexual activity was reduced, 94% tried unsuccessfully, 85% continued to involve in sexual activity despite the consequences. The sufferer “experiences withdrawal symptoms such as depression, anxiety, rumination” (256) as well as difficulty quitting. Like wise smoking, excessive sexual behavior is more of an addiction issue than a disorder. The authors also mention that no conclusive treatment has been discovered for different reasons. One being because it is a rather sensitive and embarrassing subject, sufferers rarely seek medical advice and help. It is important to understand not only the biological reasoning behind such addiction but also to analyze the psychological, and social influences on the individual. The biopsychosocial aspect was examined by Paula Hall’s article “A Bio Psychosocial View of Sexual Addiction.” According to the author it is critical to examine sexual addiction according to the biopsychosocial model as “it allows us to expand our thinking beyond the traditional medical model into psychological considerations and further into the societal context and construct of the perceived problem” (217). The article first outlines what the addiction might mean and then moves on to explain the biology, psychology, and social perspective. Contrary to the normal thought, the reason for sexual addiction is not blatantly driven by a high sexual drive. Sexual addiction might be a method for avoiding “negative feelings such as boredom, depression, or anxiety” (218). The biology of the addiction is explained in terms of Dopamine dysregulation. Dopamine being the primary...
tracking img