Sexting: Human Sexual Behavior and Snap Chat

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Sexting

Intro to Computer Ethics –CSI 140
4/22/2013
Position Paper 2
Adam Ayouch

Sexting is the act of forwarding or text messaging sexually suggestive, sexually explicit, nude or partially nude pictures to another person. It recent years this trend of sexting has grown to be hugely more common as the use of cell phones has expanded throughout the whole world. In the article Sexting, Substance Use, and Sexual Behavior in Young Adults studies show that there is a strong relationship between sexting and high risk sexual behavior and well as the likelihood of contracting a sexually transmitted infection. In this paper will bring to light the ethical issues that come into play concerning the topic of sexting. In my own personal concern on the matter I feel that sexting not only leads to high risk sexual behavior but also has a negative impact on society as a whole. I will bring to light why it is unethical to participate in sexting or activities of similar nature. With that said I feel that nobody should participate in the act of sexting and those laws concerning the matter should both be stricter and more heavily punishable.

With the correlation between high risks sexually behavior and sexting there is still a magnitude of arguments against it. One of these is exploited in the article “Legal experts detail risks of “sexting”” where they discuss all of the legal implications involved. Many of these offenses are punishable under felony guidelines. Given the many arguments for it there are still arguments for it. It is a person’s right if they are above the legal age to send nude pictures of them self if they so please. With that said I still believe that it is unethical and unmoral to do so.

In the article “2012 Sexting Statistics & What Parents and Youth Pastors Can Do” found on the website Churchmag.com the author Jeremy Smith evaluates some current statistics on sexting. These statistics were gathered thru surveys and showed some interesting trends. This website showed that 22 percent of teenage girls and 18 percent of teenage boys have sexted before. One statistic that was unsettling to me was that 11 percent of the teenage girls who had sexted were under the age of 16. Of the people who reported they had sexted 17 percent of them claimed they had forwarded the image to another person. This shows that more people may view the image then were originally intended. Also mentioned on this website is the 86 percent of the people who reported that they were sexting claim to have never been caught.

In the previously mentioned article “Legal experts detail risks of “sexting”” many of the regulations and punishments of sexting are discussed. If you are under or over the age of 18, and have a sexually revealing picture on your phone of a minor, you are technically in possession of child pornography. This crime is potentially charged and prosecuted as a felony. When this photo is sent to a group of friends or a third party, the crime of distribution of child pornography has then been committed. Also, if this photo is posted to a social networking site accessible across state lines it then becomes a potential federal offense as well as still a felony offense. In my opinion these laws are adequate and the punishments are fitting to the crime. With that said other actions still need to be done to steer people against sexting. When someone is caught sexting in addition to their punishment I feel that they should be given a lesson that depicts many of the risks involved by present information about all the effects of sexting. With increasing technology it seems that there are ways around from ever being caught sexting. The smart phone application “Snap Chat” is one method people use to sext that may lead one to believe that it takes out all the risk. Snap Chat is an application that has come around recently and has vastly grown in popularity. It sends a picture from phone to another with a time limit set in place by...
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