Sexism and Healthcare

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The article I’ve chosen is in reference to gender roles and sexism in medicine. The title is: Changing gender roles and sexism in medicine. It was written by Lori Eldred on May 31 2006. The publishing information for this article is found at this link: http://www.vermontbiz.com/article/june/health-care-gender-roles.

Doctors in our society are predominantly male and come largely from middle class backgrounds and respected professions. Their patients differ in that they are mostly from working class background and are non-professionals. Their women patients differ in gender, which adds another dimension to the social distance between them. This distance decreases when the patient is from the middle class and or is a professional. The situation is no different for the women patient if the doctor is a woman. The women doctor graduation from a male dominated school has to, in order to survive imbibe and integrate the dominant value system, whether it be about women or about the poor. This process is facilitated by the fact that they have, because of their location in society, already internalized many of these values, including those of woman's place in society.

Female doctors make less than male physicians. Everyone hypothesized all sorts of reasons. Female doctors prefer more family-friendly hours and less call, which may impact their salary. Women are simply worse negotiators than men. Blatant sexism exists when hiring new physicians. Money isn’t as important to women as it is to men. All of which may, or may not, be true. Communication failures occur largely due to power and gender issues and dismissive attitudes of physicians. Physicians continue to view their role as superior to those of nurses and don’t understand nor value the role of nursing opinion or judgment. Physicians who do not value nursing, may be slow to respond to nursing concerns, leaving the nurse feeling devalued, unappreciated, frustrated and angry - so they avoid...
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