Sex Roles

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The most common and traditional gender roles imply that men are supposed to be “masculine” and women are supposed to be “feminine.” Defined using dictionary.com, masculine means “having qualities traditionally ascribed to men, such as strength and boldness,” while feminine means “having qualities traditionally ascribed to women, such as sensitivity or gentleness.” The society regard that women accept what happens and allows what others do, without response or resistance, and that they require someone for financial, emotional, and other support, all of this by its nature. On the opposite side, men should have the courage to face extreme danger and difficulty, without retreating, and have the power to perform physically demanding tasks. Many social scientists are interested about studying these stereotypes. How do these gender differences occur? Is it because of the cultural influence or the biological condition? Do their hormonal differences influence their behaviors and attitudes? Does culture determine gender roles?

Men and Women have different chromosomes and the genetic structure is a decisive factor for the physical development of the human body. In earlier periods was understandable roles, man had to hunt and women were limited to the domestic sphere. Today with developed industries and suppose equality among any gender, this role should not be the reality .Gender roles are what men and woman learn as the way they are supposed to act.

Jerry Levy of the University of Chicago has found differences in the way male and female brain are arranged, in a systematic way, and he said that these differences in brain function are caused by the hormonal effect. As far as the theory that hormones or genes may control the personality traits or behaviors of each gender, so far, there has been absolutely no direct evidence that this is the case (Renzetti & Curran, 1989). Professor Steven Goldberg, Chairman of the Department of Sociology at City College of New York...
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