Sex Jhklkug; Iug

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 90
  • Published : April 13, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
S NAKES IN SUITS
When Psychopaths Go to Work

Paul Babiak, Ph.D., and Robert D. Hare, Ph.D.

In memory of Cheryl, and Paul

C ONTENTS

Preface
Act I, Scene I - Grand Entrance
1. Nice Suit. Would a Snake Wear Such a Nice Suit?
2. Who Are These People?
Act I, Scene II - Off and Running

v
1
5
17
31

3. What You See May Not Be What You See

35

Act II, Scene I - Hail-Fellow-Well-Met

59

4. Psychopathic Manipulation: How Did He Do That?
Act II, Scene II - Plucking the Apple

63
81

5. Enter the Psychopath, Stage Left

85

Act III, Scene I - Panic Time

107

6. Pawns, Patrons, and Patsies: Roles in the
Psychopath’s Drama

111

iv

Contents

Act III, Scene II - An Honest Mistake?
7. Darkness and Chaos: The Psychopath’s Friends
Act III, Scene III - Let’s Do Lunch
8. I’m Not a Psychopath, I Just Talk and Act Like One
Act IV - Doubts Dance Away
9. Enemy at the Gates
Act V, Scene I - Circle the Wagons
10. Hot Buttons and Weak Spots: Personal Self-Defense
Act V, Scene II - Unraveling the Puzzle
11. The Fifth Column: Psychopaths in Our Midst
Act V, Scene III - The Rise and the Fall

143
147
169
173
201
205
259
263
291
297
321

Notes

323

Acknowledgments

327

Index

329

About the Authors
Other Books by Robert D. Hare, Ph.D.
Credits
Cover
Copyright
About the Publisher

P REFACE

Most workers are honest, loyal, law-abiding citizens, concerned with making a living, contributing to society, and raising a family in a fair and just world. Others, though, are more selfish, concerned only about themselves with little regard for fairness and equity. Unfortunately, there are some individuals in the business world who allow the responsibilities of leadership and the perks of power to override their moral sense. A rise in the number of reports of abuse in major corporations should not be a surprise, given the increased access to unrestricted power, resources of startling proportions, and the erosion of ethical standards and values. Some who have faltered may have experienced a weakened moral sense of “right” in the face of excessive temptation and easy access to power. Others may feel justified in reaping the rewards in proportion to the size of the organization they lead, arguing that their extravagances seem excessive only to those who have little hope of being so rewarded. Still others have embraced the self-serving mantras that “greed is good” and that success at any cost to others is justifiable and

vi

Preface

even desirable. But another group exists, one whose behaviors and attitudes are potentially much more destructive to the organization and its employees than those noted above who are motivated by greed or big egos. This group, the subject of this book, displays a personality disorder rooted in lying, manipulation, deceit, egocentricity, callousness, and other potentially destructive traits. This personality disorder, one of the first to be described in the psychiatric literature, is psychopathy.

A dozen or so personality disorders have found their way into the psychiatric nomenclature. What makes psychopathy unique is that its defining characteristics and traits often lead to behaviors that conflict with the generally accepted norms and laws of society. Some people with psychopathic personalities are in prison because of their crimes against people and property. Others are in prison for committing economic or white-collar crimes, such as fraud, embezzlement, or stock manipulation. These are crimes against businesses and institutions, as well as the employees who work in them. In addition to the problems their abusive behaviors cause to spouses, friends, and family members, individuals with a heavy dose of psychopathic traits are potentially harmful to professional relationships. For example, their grandiosity, sense of entitlement, and lack of personal insight lead to conflict and rivalry with bosses and coworkers, and their...
tracking img