Sex and Violence in the God of Small Things Essay

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Sex and Violence in “The God of Small Things”

“The God of Small Things” by Arundhati Roy, a novel taking place in India, is a story which revolves around the death of a young girl, Sophie Mol. The author wrote this based on the problems happening in India. Sex, and violence, two contrasting ideas, though they are the main themes throughout the novel. Beautiful yet appalling, such as; the molestation of a child, tragic affair, sexual trade, and incest.

In the novel, the family was going out to the theatre to watch The Sound of Music, being a child and enjoying the Musical so he sung along. Estha was told to be quiet, but he didn’t, so Ammu sent him out of the theatre, and told him to continue singing out in the cinema foyer. Estha went out and continued to sing the songs from the movie, by himself. He woke up the Orangedrink Lemondrink man, who was behind the counter sleeping. Soon, after the Man asked Estha to come to him, so Estha approached him. They had a chat, and he offered Estha a free drink, though Estha had to do something for him in return. It says on page 103, ““Now if you’ll kindly hold this for me,” the Orangedrink Lemondrink Man said, handing Estha his penis through his soft white muslin dhoti, “I’ll get you your drink. Orange? Lemon?”” (103)

We later find out that Velutha and Ammu has an affair. Though their affair was amazing, Velutha’s life ended with a catastrophic death. He was beaten up to death for having to confess about killing Sophie Mol, although, she drowned in the river, by accident. It wasn’t even Velutha’s fault.

In the novel, we then find out the reason why Ammu has left her husband. Her husband was an alcoholic, “Her husband turned out to be not just a heavy drinker but a full-blown alcoholic with all an alcoholic’s deviousness and tragic charm.”(40) Through this quote, Roy uses strong adjectives like “an alcoholic’s deviousness” and “tragic charm”. She also uses rich languange, such as a metaphor; “not just a...
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