Sex and Gender

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Developmental Psychology aims to explain the growth of an individual from its birth to death. In this developmental process an individual goes through a lot of stages and changes within these stages. One of such stage of development is the sexual identity of an individual which is developed biologically as sex and psychologically as gender. Though words sex and gender are used synonymously to each other, there are many differences between them. Sex refers to biological differences such as difference in chromosomes, hormones, internal and external sex organs. Such attributes are given to each individual at the time when they enter this world (Golombok & Fivush, 1994). Whereas, gender describes the characteristics that society or culture defines as masculine or feminine. Gender attributes to the social norms that divide individuals into males and females (Myers, 2010). This essay shall put light upon the topic for how the terms sex and gender differ from one another and how gender develops in every individual.

Sex is a biological definition which encloses the physiology, anatomy, hormonal, chromosomal distinction of every individual within that species (Oliffe, et al, 2012). It is hence, a scientific term that explains the sexual preferences of an individual. Distinct cultures conceive sex differences in distinguishable ways, the knowledge and the understanding of sex have shifted over time (and continue to vary) as biological variation is discovered and technological advances are modified (Oliffe, et al, 2012). On the other hand, unlike sex, the concept of 'gender' is not an inbuilt attribute. Rather, it refers to the sociable attitudes and behaviors. . Moreover, gender is subject to change culturally with time. In this era, where both the genders males and females are being treated equally, it is quite difficult to assign genders based on what an individual does for a living (Torgrimson & Minson, 2005). Hence, with time gender is developed and...
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