Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

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Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

By | May 2013
Page 1 of 8

THE SEVEN WONDERS

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PYRAMIDS OF GIZA

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HANGING GARDENS

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TEMPLE OF ARTEMIS
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STATUE OF ZEUS

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COLOSSUS

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LIGHTHOUSE OF ALEXANDRIA
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THE MAUSOLEUM AT HALICARNASSUS

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The Mausoleum at Halicarnassus was the tomb of king Mausolus. Halicarnassus (Modern Bodrum, Turkey) was the capital of a small Mediterranean kingdom. In 377 B.C., Hecatomnus of Mylasa, the ruler of this land, died and left control of the kingdom to his son, Mausolus. Mausolus’ reign lasted for 24 years. He loved and adored the Greek culture and founded several cities of Greek design along the coast.

In 353 B.C., Mausolus died, leaving his queen Artemisia broken hearted. She decided to build the most splendid tomb in the known world as a tribute to him. The tomb became so famous that Mausolus’s name is now associated with all stately tombs throughout the world as Mausoleum. It became one of the seven wonders of the ancient world because of its rich statuary and carvings in relief.

Artemisia sent messengers to Greece to find the most talented sculptors; she decided that no expense was to be spared in building the tomb.

The tomb was errected on a hill overlooking the city. The entire structure sat in the center of an enclosed courtyard on a stone platform. A staircase, flanked with stone lions, led to the top of this platform. There were many statues of gods and godesses along the outer wall of the courtyard. The tomb was guarded by stone warriors mounted on horseback at each corner stone.

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The tomb itself was at the center of the platform. The marble structure rose as a square, tapering block to about one-third of the Mausoleum’s 1140 feet height. This section was covered wit relief sculptures showing action scenes from Greek mythology. Thirty-six slim columns rose on top of this section for another third of the height. Between each column were more statues. A solid block...