Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

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  • Topic: Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, Great Pyramid of Giza, Ancient Egypt
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  • Published : August 4, 2008
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Abstract
Various Wonders of the World lists have been compiled over the ages in order to catalogue the most spectacular natural and man-made constructions. The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World is the first known list of remarkable man-made creations of classical antiquity, and was based on guide-books popular among Hellenic sight-seers and only includes works located around the Mediterranean rim. Later lists include those for the Medieval World, the Modern World, the Natural World and others. The list that will be discussed today is the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The historian Herodotus (484 BC–ca. 425 BC), and the scholar Callimachus of Cyrene (ca 305–240 BC) at the Museum of Alexandria, made early lists of "seven wonders" but their writings have not survived, except as references. The earliest extant version of a list of seven wonders was compiled by Antipater of Sidon, who described the structures in a poem around 140 BC: “Have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the Colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy, and I said, 'Lo, apart from Olympus, the Sun never looked on aught so grand.” -Antipater, Greek Anthologist. The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World are: 1.Lighthouse of Alexandria

2.Colossus of Rhodes
3.Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus
4.Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
5.Statue of Zeus at Olympia
6.Hanging Gardens of Babylon
7.Great Pyramid of Giza

SEVEN WONDERS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD

The First Wonder of the Ancient World is the Great Pyramid of Giza. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza Necropolis bordering what is now Cairo, Egypt in Africa, and is the only remaining member of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is believed to have been built as a tomb for Fourth dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu (hellenized as Χεωψ, Cheops) and constructed over a 20 year period concluding around 2560 BC. . The tallest man-made structure in the world for over 3,800 years, it is sometimes called Khufu's Pyramid or the Pyramid of Khufu. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the main part of a complex setting of buildings that included two mortuary temples in honor of Khufu (one close to the pyramid and one near the Nile), three smaller pyramids for Khufu's wives, an even smaller "satellite" pyramid, a raised causeway connecting the two temples, and small mastaba tombs surrounding the pyramid for nobles. One of the small pyramids contains the tomb of queen Hetepheres (discovered in 1925), sister and wife of Sneferu and the mother of Khufu. There was a town for the workers of Giza, including a cemetery, bakeries, a beer factory and a copper smelting complex. More buildings and complexes are being discovered by The Giza Mapping Project. The generally accepted estimated date of its completion is c. 2560 BC. Although this date contradicts radiocarbon dating evidence, it is loosely supported by a lack of archaeological findings for the existence prior to the fourth dynasty of a civilization with sufficient population or technical ability in the area. Khufu's vizier, Hemon, or Hemiunu, is believed by some to be the architect of the Great Pyramid. Many people have different theories on how the pyramid was built. Polish architect Wieslaw Kozinski believed that it took as many as 20 men to transport a 1.5-ton stone block. Based on this, he estimated the workforce to be 300,000 men on the construction site, with an additional 60,000 off-site. 19th century Egyptologist William Flinders Petrie proposed that the workforce was largely composed not of slaves but of the rural Egyptian population, working during periods when the Nile river was flooded and agricultural activity suspended. The Second wonder of the ancient...
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