Setting Up a Database

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Setting up a database
1. Introduction
In order to complete my client’s needs I created a database and I started my work with Word Access 2010. This is how it looked at the beginning as I started my work today on the 5th of the October 2010. Today was our starting point for creating my clients database. The screenshot above shows that I opened Access 2010 to begin creating my clients database.

2. Creating tables, setting fields + deciding on data types. Once Microsoft Access was open I had to create my tables, simply by going into ‘View’ and switch into ‘design view’ and name my first table.

Firstly I had to name my tables in order ‘Customer Details’,’ Employees’, ’Product’ so that I know which one is which and on which one I am working. This is the screenshot of the design view of my first table with no data entered yet.

This is a design view of my first table
This is a design view of my first table
On the 5th of October as we started creating our database we also started designing the database and I created my first table that will provide me with my customer’s details. Firstly I created one of these tables manually on a blank sheet and I kept the sample in my folder. The fields in my first table include: customer ID number, first name, surname, address, contact number, town and post code and their sex. Also we can see I entered a primary Key to my first table and selected data type as an auto number. After that in the same way I created my other two tables which were named ‘Employees’ and ‘Product’ - shown on the next page.

This is a screenshot of my second table that included employee’s information details. Both screenshots show the same table only the second one shows it in a design view. I had to add the following fields into design view where I included: employee ID number, employee first name, surname, employee contact number, street name, town and post code.

Additionally this screenshot presents the design view of the same table, which present employee’s details. Just like the previous one this also has a primary key in and the first data type is AutoNumber. Again all the fields were chosen according to my client needs.

Furthermore, here below I included the screenshots of my third and final table- ‘Products’. This table would include all the important information about the certain products such as: product ID number, product name, price, how many there are in store, in other words quantity, supplier contact number and employee ID number.

Furthermore I included a primary key in this table as well as in the previous ones.

3. Validation Rules
The next thing I have done was to input the validation rule and this screenshot as well as the next one show the steps I followed. The validation rules I have included are:

Once I pressed the three little dots on the side of the field this is what has come up on the screen. The next action taken was entering the validation rules in and pressing ‘OK’ button in order to create them. Once I pressed the three little dots on the side of the field this is what has come up on the screen. The next action taken was entering the validation rules in and pressing ‘OK’ button in order to create them.

This is the screen shot showing the validation rule being inputted correctly as ‘ M or F’ shows up in a field. 4. Input Masks
The next thing we did in order for the database to work was including Input Mask into a database, in order to do it right I had to open up the table I wanted to work on and go to the design view, the next step involved pressing the three little dots at the end of the field where it said ‘Input Mask’ as shown in a screenshot below.

Once I pressed that this window showed up on my screen, it’s called Input Mask Wizard because there was no other way for me to get this work and then I had to pick one of the input masks that matched my data. In this case I...
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