Servant Leadership

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 279
  • Published : November 30, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
Outline the key features of one theory/model of leadership
servant-leadership
vision
Sergiovanni (2005) viewed vision as such a crucial element for change because it greatly influences the process of transformation in the servant-leader and in teachers, parents, and students and the school community as a whole. A good vision is meaningful if it is credible and can propel constituents to embrace it. Sergiovanni (1993) prescribed servant-leadership as the leadership style which could effectively meet the needs of the changing landscape in contemporary schools,

Stewardship
Sergiovanni (1992) explains that stewardship ―involves the leader‘s personal responsibility to manage her or his life and affairs with proper regard for the rights of other people and for the common welfare‖ (p. 139). Effective schools provide an environment for the common good of all students, regardless of their particular needs. Caring

Sergiovanni(1994) claims that “caring as an integral part of shared community” (p.146).

Commitment to the growth of people
The servant-leader is committed to the individual growth of human beings and will do everything they can to nurture others. Sergiovanni (2001) puts this in a school perspective: The leader serves as head follower by leading the discussion about what is worth following, and by modeling, teaching, and helping others to become better followers. When this happens, the emphasis changes from direct leadership based on rules and personality, to a different kind of leadership based on stewardship and service (p. 34).

Moral community leader
“Moral community provides for moral connections among teachers, students, and it advocates helping all of them to become self-managing. These connections satisfy the needs for coordination and commitment that any enterprise must meet to be successful.” “Moral connections are stronger than the connections that come from extrinsic or intrinsic rewards. Moral connections are grounded in cultural norms rather than in psychological needs.” “The leader serves as head follower by leading the discussion about what is worth following and by modeling, teaching, and helping others to become better followers.” “When this happens, the emphasis changes from direct leadership based on rules and personality, to a different kind of leadership based on stewardship and service.” The secret: To replace communication with conversation

Conversation may not be able to move mountains, but it can get teachers, citizens, state officials, and other stakeholders to think differently, to join together in a union of mutual responsibility, and to make good decisions together for children. Since conversation is relational reciprocal, it requires commitment to mutuality相互關係, 共同性. Mutuality implies the sharing of power with, by, and among people regardless of their level or role in a way that recognizes the dignity of each, and to sustain this sharing. And the more that heads practice mutuality by engaging in conversation with others, the more they count. Conversation is the way to bring people together, to build up needed capacity, and to win the commitment needed from everyone to make the school well. (Sergiovanni, 2001)

Sees school as community
Why is community building important in schools?
“Community is the tie that binds students and teachers together in special ways, to something more significant than themselves: shared values and ideals. It lifted both teachers ans students to higher levels of self-understanding, commitment, and performance-beyond the reaches of the shortcomings and difficulties they face in their everyday lives”.

“Community can help teachers and students be transformed from a collection of “Is” to a collective “we”, thus providing them with a unique and enduring sense of identity, belonging, and place”. (Sergiovanni, 1994) Schools can become communities in may different forms:

1. Caring communities
2....
tracking img