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Sepoy Mutiny

  • Course: World History
Page 1 of 2
Who:
The Sepoy Mutiny was between Hindus, Muslims, and the British. The Sikhs, a religious group that had not been very hostile, remained loyal to the British. Many of the maharajahs and princes who had already made alliances with the East India Company did NOT take part in this rebellion. The rebellion not only impacted the British in India, but also the British back in Britain. Because of the growing rebellion, the British government had to send more troops to help, effecting more people and families.

When:
The Sepoy Mutiny took place starting on May 10, 1857 and ending in 1858 when the British government took direct command of India. At the time, Britain had control of most of the Indian subcontinent. Britain used India for raw material, due to industrialization taking place in Britain and it’s lack of resources. India was considered the brightest “jewel in the crown” during this time, which shows how valuable it is to Britain. The british also had restrictions set up to prevent India from having an economy that operates on its own.

Where:
The Sepoy Mutiny took place in India, Britian’s brightest “jewel in the crown”. This mutiny was specifically in Delhi, northern India, and central India. Britain was also affected, although the mutiny did not take place there.

Why:
This event occurred because of news that the Enfield rifles that the indian soldiers had been given were sealed with beef and pork fat. Because Hindus considered cows sacred and Muslims don’t eat pork, they were infuriated about this news. Later a garrison commander was shocked when 85 out of the 90 sepoys, or indian soldiers, refused to accept the rifle. The British handled this crisis by putting the sepoys who disobeyed in jail, which wasn’t a very good idea because the following day, the sepoys rebelled. This was the start of the Sepoy Mutiny.

How:
The Mutiny started off when the Sepoys captured Delhi and from there the rebellion spread to northern and central India....
Who:
The Sepoy Mutiny was between Hindus, Muslims, and the British. The Sikhs, a
religious group that had not been very hostile, remained loyal to the British. Many of
the maharajahs and princes who had already made alliances with the East India
Company did NOT take part in this rebellion. The rebellion not only impacted the British
in India, but also the British back in Britain. Because of the growing rebellion, the
British government had to send more troops to help, effecting more people and
families.
When:
The Sepoy Mutiny took place starting on May 10, 1857 and ending in 1858 when the
British government took direct command of India. At the time, Britain had control of
most of the Indian subcontinent. Britain used India for raw material, due to
industrialization taking place in Britain and it’s lack of resources. India was considered
the brightest “jewel in the crown” during this time, which shows how valuable it is to
Britain. The british also had restrictions set up to prevent India from having an
economy that operates on its own.
Where:
The Sepoy Mutiny took place in India, Britian’s brightest “jewel in the crown”. This
mutiny was specifically in Delhi, northern India, and central India. Britain was also
affected, although the mutiny did not take place there.
Why:
This event occurred because of news that the Enfield rifles that the indian soldiers had
been given were sealed with beef and pork fat. Because Hindus considered cows
sacred and Muslims don’t eat pork, they were infuriated about this news. Later a
garrison commander was shocked when 85 out of the 90 sepoys, or indian soldiers,
refused to accept the rifle. The British handled this crisis by putting the sepoys who
disobeyed in jail, which wasn’t a very good idea because the following day, the sepoys
rebelled. This was the start of the Sepoy Mutiny.
How: