Sensory Recepters

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5 types of sensory receptors are:
chemoreceptor 

A sense organ, or one of its cells (such as those for the sense of taste or smell), that can respond to a chemical stimulus; a chemosensor.
mechanoreceptor 

Any information about mechanical changes in its environment, such as movement, tension and pressure.
photoreceptor 

A specialized neuron able to detect, and react to light
nociceptor 

A sensory receptor that sends signals that cause the perception of pain in response to a potentially damaging stimulus.
thermoreceptor 

A nerve cell that is sensitive to changes in temperature

A sensation is : A physical feeling or perception resulting from something that happens to or comes into contact with the body.

A projection is: process by which the brain causes a sensation to seem to come from the region of the body being stimulated.

Sensory adaptation is: The phenomenon of a sensation becoming less noticeable once it has been recognized by constant repeated stimulation.

Touch utilizes sensory nerve fibers, meissner’s corpuscles, and pacinian corpuscles.

The two types of temperature receptors are cold and warm thermoreceptors

Somatic sense > Pain is stimulated when there is tissue damage

The special senses are; vision, hearing, smell, and taste.

Stretch receptors are mechanoreceptors responsive to distention of various organs and muscles, and are neurologically linked to the medulla in the brain stem via afferent nerve fibers. Examples include stretch receptors in the arm and leg muscles and tendons, in the heart, in the colon wall, and in the lungs.

Smell involves olfactory receptor cells

Stretch receptors are mechanoreceptors responsive to distention of various organs and muscles, and are neurologically linked to the medulla in the brain stem via afferent nerve fibers. Examples include stretch receptors in the arm and leg muscles and tendons, in the heart, in the colon wall, and in the...
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