Self Healing Robots

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  • Topic: Engineering, Industrial robot, Genetic algorithm
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SELF HEALING ROBOTS

A SEMINAR REPORT Submitted by

AKHIL

in partial fulfillment for the award of the degree of

BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY
in COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

COCHIN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, COCHIN – 682022 NOV 2008
 

DIVISION OF COMPUTER ENGINEERING SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING COCHIN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, COCHIN – 682022

Bonafide Certificate

Certified that this is a bonafide record of the seminar entitled “Self healing robots” done by “Akhil” of the VIIth semester Computer Science and Engineering in the year 2008 in partial fulfillment of the requirements to the award of degree of bachelor of technology in Computer Science and Engineering of Cochin University of Science and Technology. Mrs. Ancy Zachariah SEMINAR GUIDE Lecturer Division of Computer Science SOE, CUSAT Date: Dr. David Peter S Head of the Department Division of Computer Science SOE, CUSAT

   

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I thank my seminar guide Mrs. Ancy Zachariah, Lecturer, CUSAT, for her proper guidance and valuable suggestions. I am greatly thankful to Mr. David Peter, the HOD, Division of Computer Engineering & other faculty members for giving me an opportunity to learn and do this seminar. If not for the above mentioned people, my seminar would never have been completed successfully. I once again extend my sincere thanks to all of them. Akhil

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Table of Contents
Chapter No. Abstract List of tables List of figures 1 Introuction 1.1 Robots 1.2. Error recovery 2 Self healing or self modelling robots 2.1 Researchers 2.2 The starfish robot 2.2.1 Characterizing the target system 2.3 Self modelling briefly 3 Algorithm 3.1 Algorithm overview 3.2 Experimental setup 3.2.1 The robots 3.2.2 The controllers 3.3 Algorithm implementation 3.4 Results of estimation-exploration algorithm 3.5 Analysis of estimation-exploration algorithm  

Title

Page No. vi vii viii 1 2

3

4

6 13 14 16 16 18 19 22

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3.6 Estimation-exploration algorithm

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From theory to reality 4.1 Characterizing the target system 4.2 Characterizing the space of models 4.3 Characterizing the space of controllers 4.4 Results: parametric identification 4.5 Results: topological identification

27 27 27 29 29 30 32 33

5 6

Conclusion Bibliography

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ABSTRACT

When people or animals get hurt, they can usually compensate for minor injuries and keep limping along, but for robots, even slight damage can make them stumble and fall. Now a robot scarcely larger than a human hand has demonstrated a novel ability: It can recover from damage -- an innovation that could make robots more independent. The new robot, which looks like a splay-legged, four-footed starfish, deduces the shape of its own body by performing a series of playful movements, swiveling its four limbs. By using sensors to record resulting changes in the angle of its body, it gradually generates a computerized image of itself. The robot then uses this to plan out how to walk forward. The researchers hope similar robots will someday respond not only to damage to their own bodies but also to changes in the surrounding environment. Such responsiveness could lend autonomy to robotic explorers on other planets like Mars -a helpful feature, since such robots can't always be in contact with human controllers on earth. Aside from practical value, the robot's abilities suggest a similarity to human thinking as the robot tries out various actions to figure out the shape of its world.



   

List of tables
Sl. No. 2.1 2.2 2.3 3.1 Tables Overall dimensions of robot Actuation changes Results of baseline algorithms Damage scenarios tested Page No. 4 5 10 22

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List of figures
Sl. No. 1.1 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 4.1 Images Robot Researchers Starfish robot model with reflection Outline of algorithm Robot modeling and behavior Flow chart Simulated robots used for...
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