Security vs. Privacy

Topics: Director of National Intelligence, Security, Maslow's hierarchy of needs Pages: 2 (705 words) Published: December 3, 2012
If there's a debate that sums up post-9/11 politics, it's security versus privacy. Which is more important? How much privacy are you willing to give up for security? Can we even afford privacy in this age of insecurity? Security versus privacy: It's the battle of the century, or at least its first decade. In a Jan. 21 New Yorker article, Director of National Intelligence Michael McConnell discusses a proposed plan to monitor all -- that's right, all -- internet communications for security purposes, an idea so extreme that the word "Orwellian" feels too mild. The article (now online here) contains this passage:

In order for cyberspace to be policed, internet activity will have to be closely monitored. Ed Giorgio, who is working with McConnell on the plan, said that would mean giving the government the authority to examine the content of any e-mail, file transfer or Web search. "Google has records that could help in a cyber-investigation," he said. Giorgio warned me, "We have a saying in this business: 'Privacy and security are a zero-sum game.'" I'm sure they have that saying in their business. And it's precisely why, when people in their business are in charge of government, it becomes a police state. If privacy and security really were a zero-sum game, we would have seen mass immigration into the former East Germany and modern-day China. While it's true that police states like those have less street crime, no one argues that their citizens are fundamentally more secure. We've been told we have to trade off security and privacy so often -- in debates on security versus privacy, writing contests, polls, reasoned essays and political rhetoric -- that most of us don't even question the fundamental dichotomy. But it's a false one.

Security and privacy are not opposite ends of a seesaw; you don't have to accept less of one to get more of the other. Think of a door lock, a burglar alarm and a tall fence. Think of guns, anti-counterfeiting measures on currency and...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • privacy vs security Essay
  • Security VS privacy Essay
  • Privacy vs. National Security Essay
  • Individual Privacy vs. National Security Essay
  • Individual Privacy vs. National Security Essay
  • National Security vs Individaul Privacy Research Paper
  • National Security vs. Personal Privacy Essay
  • Airport Security vs. Passenger Privacy Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free