Security Sector Transformation

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Security Sector Transformation

By | Jan. 2013
Page 1 of 13
UNIVERSITY OF ZAMBIA
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF POST GRADUATE STUDIES

NAME/

COMPUTER NO:HENRY NYUNDU (512800392)

JACK SINYANGWE (STUDENT NO)

BRIAN MUIMUI (STUDENT NO)

CHOLA KATANGA (STUDENT NO)

COURSE:DSS-5055

LECTURER:PROF B J PHIRI

DUE DATE:14 AUGUST 2012

SEMINAR TOPIC:IN A NUMBER OF COUNTRIES, CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT OF AND ENGAGEMENT WITH POLICING ARE TWO METHODS OF IMPROVING THE DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE OF THE SECURITY SECTOR. THERE ARE, HOWEVER, SERIOUS QUESTIONS ABOUT THE DEGREE TO WHICH SUCH MECHANISMS COULD FOSTER DEMOCRATIC POLICING IN A SYSTEM CHARACTERIZED BY A LOW LEVEL OF OVERALL DEMOCRACY. WITH THE AID OF EXAMPLES FROM ANY TWO SOUTHERN AFRICAN COUNTRIES DISCUSS THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE STATEMENT IS TRUE.

INTRODUCTION

Civilian oversight of and engagement with policing are viewed as two methods of improving the democratic governance of the security sector. This is true because of the roles played by these organisations in providing checks and balances on the activities of the security sector. The security sector must be transformed so as to create a secure environment that is conducive to development, poverty reduction, good governance and, in particular, the growth of democratic states and institutions based on the rule of law. This relies on the ability of the state to mitigate its people’s vulnerabilities through development, and to use a range of policy instruments to prevent or address security threats that affect society’s well-being. This includes establishing appropriate civilian oversight of security actors. Hence, a broader range of state institutions is now being considered in the provision of security, with the military seen as one instrument among many. The ‘security sector’ includes traditional security actors such as the armed forces and police; oversight bodies such as the executive and legislature; civil society organisations; justice and...