Second Hand Car Market (E-Commerce)

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1. Executive Summary

Selling online can help your business reach new markets and increase your sales and revenue gains. Those who are interested in selling to other businesses, can use the Internet to find sales leads, announce calls for tender, and to offer products for sale. Searching for products and services online can save time and money by allowing to find the best prices without having to do all the legwork. You can use the Internet to find new suppliers, post buying requests or search for products and services. The benefits of effective B2B e-commerce include lower costs associated with selecting suppliers, establishing prices, ordering, and finalizing transactions. Online trading networks can also be used to support efficient information exchange between buyers and sellers.

2. Business description

Mission —The mission of Budget Cars will be to buy and sell a desirable mix of quality used cars, trucks, and vans, and to create a friendly atmosphere where Budget Cars will be known for being your family used car center.

3. Industry analysis

Immediately following World War II, there were roughly nine buyers for every new car produced. Sales personnel merely had to find out who could afford a new car. "Afford" was defined as paying cash. This condition existed until the early 1950s when supply began to discover that some new terms were creeping into the retail salesperson's vocabulary. Words like "overallowance," "discount," "deal," and "terms." The emphasis, however, was still not on product but on price. In addition, the asking price was no longer final. There was also, if you could haggle a little, a taking price. It was possible to bargain with the dealer for the first time.

During the 1960s, other new merchandising techniques were introduced. "Sticker price," "fleet price," "hard sell," "50 over invoice," "high-powered advertising," and "free" accessories were but a few new innovations. The buyer was becoming better educated, better able to buy—thanks to 24- and 36-month payments—but still confused and fearful of price. "Good deals" became "bad deals" after talking to friends and neighbors. Caution became the watchword when buying a car.

The advent of the 1970s brought more confusion to buyers with new procedures like leasing, 48-month payments, credit unions, rebates, and consumer advocates. However, in defense of the consumer, books on "How to Buy a Car," "Invoice Prices U.S. Cars," and "Used Car Buyers Guide," were published and sold by the millions.

During the 1970s automobile salespeople became conditioned to the notion that customers were interested in only one thing—the very lowest price. The automobile showroom atmosphere didn't change very much from the 1970s to the 1980s. Most retail salespeople saw the business of selling automobile as an "us against them" hard-sell game. Those who sold popular Japanese products became arrogant and insensitive to their customers and those who sold American vehicles continued with the approach that price, and price alone, sells vehicles.

As the 1980s came to a close, however, the winds of change began to impact the retail automobile marketplace. Today, in the mid 1990s, the business of retailing automobiles is quite different than it has ever been in the past.

In today's marketplace, 5 out of every 6 cars sold in the United States are used. Knowing this fact and trying to organize and be able to provide as many possible offers in one place in mid 1990s many new second hand car advertising magazines came to market. The popularity of second hand cars made those magazines sold good. But with today’s technology and high internet usage just a print magazine is not enough to have for a successful company. There are more and more car selling online site, where is gathered a great amount of advertisements.

4. Market analysis

There are many different online car...
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