Seat Belts Save Lives

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Darius Humphrey
Comp I-GE117
Mrs. R.
30 May 2012
“Seatbelts Save Lives”
Seatbelts save lives; by wearing them we could have lower insurance premiums, have lower fatality rates in automobile accidents, and keep the cost of hospital care a little more under control. Did you know that the cost of hospital care for unbelted drivers is 50% higher than the cost for a belted driver? Studies by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration also show that most unbelted drivers tend to drive more careless and in most cases are uninsured. It’s not fair someone to drive with care, and have to pay an arm and a leg to insure their vehicle because of few reckless drivers. There are two types of seatbelt laws, primary and secondary. Primary allows an officer to issue a citation for a first offense violation and secondary gets you a warning for the first violation and then you will receive citations if you continue to break the law.

All insurance quotes are based on good driving skills. Violators of seatbelt laws are also tracked by or documented by their auto insurance companies, who in turn provide a poor driving rating. These seatbelt related violators cause rates to increase on an annual basis. Once the seatbelt law is violated a hefty fine is issued that increases insurance rates; while buckling, or obeying the law, may actually lower monthly premiums. The importance of buckling up can not be stressed enough, as it is vital to safety and well-being of everyone in any given vehicle.

In the article Risk Compensation or Risk Reduction,” authors David J. and Lilliard E. Richardson suggest that drivers enjoying greater safety are least likely to drive recklessly. Fixed-effects models with policy and demographic variables are estimated using annual state data from 1985 to 2002 to test the effect of seatbelt laws and seatbelt use rates on logged fatality rates, for occupants, pedestrians, motorcyclists, and all non-occupants in separate models. Contrary to the risk...
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