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Name: Sean Ryan Seebaran

Class: 3N

Topic: Natural Hazards

Subject: Geography

Teacher: Mr Ragbirsingh

Definition of Hazards and Disasters

Hazard
A hazard is any source of potential damage, harm or adverse health effects on something or someone under certain conditions at work. Basically, a hazard can cause harm or adverse effects (to individuals as health effects or to organizations as property or equipment losses). Sometimes a hazard is referred to as being the actual harm or the health effect it caused rather than the hazard. For example, the disease tuberculosis (TB) might be called a hazard by some but in general the TB-causing bacteria would be considered the "hazard" or "hazardous biological agent".

Hazards are sometimes classified into three modes
* Dormant - The situation has the potential to be hazardous, but no people, property, or environment is currently affected by this. For instance, a hillside may be unstable, with the potential for a landslide, but there is nothing below or on the hillside that could be affected. * Armed - People, property, or environment are in potential harm's way. * Active - A harmful incident involving the hazard has actually occurred. Often this is referred to not as an "active hazard" but as an accident, emergency, incident, or disaster.

Types of Hazard
Hazards are generally of four types, physical hazards, chemical hazards, biological hazards and allergenic hazard.

Disasters
A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. A disaster can be extensively defined as any tragic event stemming from events such as earthquakes, floods, catastrophic accidents, fires, or explosions. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of people.

In contemporary academia, disasters are seen as the consequence of inappropriately managed risk. These risks are the product of a combination of both hazard/s and vulnerability. Hazards that strike in areas with low vulnerability will never become disasters, as is the case in uninhabited regions. Developing countries suffer the greatest costs when a disaster hits – more than 95 percent of all deaths caused by disasters occur in developing countries, and losses due to natural disasters are 20 times greater (as a percentage of GDP) in developing countries than in industrialized countries.

There are two types of disasters:

Natural disasters-A natural disaster is a consequence when a natural hazard affects humans and/or the built environment. Human vulnerability, and lack of appropriate emergency management, leads to financial, environmental, or human impact.

Man Made disasters: Man-made disasters are the consequence of technological or human hazards. Examples include stampedes, fires, transport accidents, industrial accidents, oil spills and nuclear explosions/radiation. War and deliberate attacks may also be put in this category. As with natural hazards, man-made hazards are events that have not happened, for instance terrorism. Man-made disasters are examples of specific cases where man-made hazards have become reality in an event.

Examples of Hazards and Disasters

Hazards
Examples of hazards include:
* damp and mould growth
* excess cold
* excess heat
* biocides
* carbon monoxide and fuel combustion products
* lead
* radiation
* unburned fuel gas
* volatile organic compounds
* crowding and space
* entry by intruders
* lighting
* noise
* domestic hygiene, pests and refuse
* food safety
* personal hygiene, sanitation and drainage
* inadequate or dangerous water supply for domestic purposes * falls associated with baths etc
* falls on the level
* falls associated with stairs and steps
* falls...
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