Scrapbook Assignment

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Jay Jones

March 28, 2011
CJA 324
Jay Jones

Ethical Scrapbook Project

This assignment presents an ethical scrapbook entailing four categories of ethical situations in which each team member expresses their [Check pronoun agreement--if "their" refers to "member" (or a singular subject), it should be singular, too (his or her)] individual opinion. It takes a close look at real-life cases of good Samaritans, acts of vigilantism, acts of civil disobedience, and acts committed by professionals in the course of their employment. This assignment is accompanied by a Power Point [As a trade name, this is capitalized, and it is spelled as one word--PowerPoint] presenting cases that made headline news and generated public controversy impacting [Doctoral rule (although good advice for any academic writer): "impact" is a noun (a hit). It is informally used as a verb (impacting the business), but avoid this in academic writing ] and shaping society. Three cases in each category are selected [The passive voice is a form of "be" (are) and a participle (selected). Over-use of the passive voice can make paragraphs officious and tedious to read. Try to use the active voice most often; for example, passive voice = The paper was completed on time. Active voice = the student completed the paper on time--See Center for Writing Excellence > Tutorials & Guides > Grammar & Writing Guides > Active & passive voice] , assembled in a visually appealing manner, graphically illustrated, and referenced accordingly. The assignment is structured [Passive voice ] in numerous steps in which twelve [Express numbers higher than nine in digits (when not the first word in the sentence)] cases are researched [Passive voice ] and assembled, individually reviewed, compared, and discussed as a team. Furthermore, this team assignment is designated [Passive voice ] to debate and generate discussion among its members who individually and as a team evaluate and express personal opinions on a case- by- case basis. Finally, the assignment concludes by summarizing individual’s and team’s responses to each one [Wordiness: simplify by removing "one"] of the five steps involved. First, our [Use "we," "us," or "our" to mean yourself and coauthors, not general humanity (or yourself and the reader)] team member Candace McDade presents a selection of three Good Samaritan cases which [Use "that" for a restrictive phrase (or place a comma before "which")] depict selfless acts of compassionate interventions in which a life has been saved. Her contribution to the team brings forth [Check spelling--"forth" means "forward in time" or "out into notice"; "fourth" is the ordinal number corresponding to "four"] cases such as “John McDonald Saves Girl from Burning Vehicle” (Case #1), “Angela Pierce Assists Ohio Officer Under Attack” (case#2), and ”Victor Perez Saves Abducted Girl”(case [Leave a space after the quotation mark] #3). Overall [Wordiness: unless meaning denim work clothes, "overall" is general and vague and contributes little to the sentence] in the Good Samaritan Acts, I feel [Avoid use of the first person (I, me, my) in academic writing unless writing about a personal experience. Check first person use with your instructor. ] as if John McDonald and Victor Perez made good decisions in their choices. I could consider myself making similar decision under those same circumstances. In the case “Angela Pierce Assists Ohio Officer Under Attack”, [A period or comma goes inside the closing quotation mark] I believe her decision was commendable: however, [Place semicolon instead of a comma before this conjunctive adverb if it begins a new clause (and if a semicolon follows it, replace it with a comma)] I would not consider acting similarly, nor recommend that anyone take the same course of action. According to my observations, most team members share similar opinions on rather or not the individuals in the situations presented took...
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