Scope Plan

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Scope Management Plan
Version 1.0

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Table of Contents
1.Purpose4
2.Scope Management Framework4
3.Scope Management Process5
4.Scope Management Approach5
5.Roles and Responsibilities6
Appendix A: Sample Scope Management Plan7

Table of Tables
Table 1: Process Summary5
Table 2: Scope Management Roles and Responsibilities8
Table 3: WBS Dictionary10

Table of Figures
Figure 1: Process Flow Chart6
Figure 2: Work Breakdown Structure9

Purpose
Scope Management is the process to ensure that the project defines the scope of the required work as well as defines out-of scope work not necessary to support the project. The Scope Management Plan details how the project scope will be defined, developed, and verified. The Scope Management Plan clearly defines who is responsible for managing the projects’ scope and acts as a guide for managing and controlling the scope. Scope Management Framework

Project Scope Management follows a five step process: collect requirements, define scope, create a work breakdown structure (WBS), verify scope, and control scope.

1. Collect Requirements – Collecting requirements defines and documents requirements needed to meet all project objectives. To begin collecting requirements the project team should leverage the project charter and stakeholder list. Starting with the inputs, the team should identify requirements, research details to accomplish the requirements, detail the requirements, and determine measurable criteria to monitor the requirements. Refer to the Requirements Traceability Framework. Document the tools and techniques used to define the project scope such as subject matter experts (SMEs), product analysis, alternatives identification, or facilitated workshops.

2. Define Scope – Defining the scope is critical to project success. The collected requirements are an input to defining scope. Scope definition requires the development of a detailed project/product description to include deliverables, assumptions, and constraints and establishes the framework within which project work must be performed.

The Project Scope Statement should contain the following components: * Product Scope Description – describes what the project will accomplish; * Product Acceptance Criteria – describes what requirements must be met in order for the project to be accepted as complete; * Project Deliverables – detailed list of deliverables; * Project Exclusions – description of work that is not included in project scope; * Project Constraints – lists limits on resources for time, money, manpower, or equipment (capital); and * Project Assumptions – describes the assumptions the project team and stakeholders are working under to complete the project.

3. Create a WBS – This process breaks down project deliverables into progressively smaller and more manageable components. The lowest level, are called work packages. The hierarchical structure allows for more simplicity in scheduling, costing, monitoring, and controlling the project. An example of the WBS is provided in the Medicaid SMA ICD-10 Implementation Guide.

4. Verify Scope – This step allows the project team to receive a formalized acceptance of all deliverables including the deliverable owner. The scope verification should address how the deliverables will be verified against the original scope and how the deliverables from the project will be formally accepted. The deliverables for the project should be formally accepted and approved as described in the project’s RASCI Matrix.

5. Control Scope –...
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