Scientific Method Tooth Decay and Soda

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  • Topic: Tooth enamel, Dental caries, Teeth
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The Scientific Method
1. Choose a problem.
(What do you want to explore? Ask a question about it.)
* Choose something that interests you.
* Choose something that you don't know the answer to.
* Choose something you can work with.
Which soda decays fallen out teeth the most?
2. Research the problem.
(How can you find the answer to your question?)
* Look in books.
* Get advice.
* Make observations.

If you take your teeth, put them in a glass, pour soda over them and let them stand for days (or was it weeks...?), it will dissolve away the teeth. I saw a science project on it. Some kid actually acquired some used teeth and did the experiment for a science fair. I believe the clear drinks were the worst, but I don't really remember.

So, I strongly recommend not soaking your teeth in (what amounts to) sugar saturated carbonic acid (i.e. soda pop).

If, on the other hand, you take your teeth, pour soda over them momentarily then rinse immediately with a buffered, mineral-rich solution like, maybe, fresh saliva - you could probably do that daily for a lot of years before affecting any measurable reduction in tooth enamel.

By the way, lots of food are acidic. Many are more acidic than soda. I think anything tomato-sauce based qualifies, for example. (Tomato-based foods are also very effective for cleaning oxidized copper, by the way.)

I have never actually heard of a case of enamel loss due to drinking soda - and I have known people who drank on average more than a can a day, but at the same time I do not doubt that cases exist - probably extreme excessive consumption or defective saliva or defective enamel.

I don't recall ever hearing a dentist (I see one every six months) mentioning it either - So, while I agree that excessive consumption of soda is a bad idea for your teeth and your health, if it was a significant risk I would expect to see more interest from several independent sources.

Read more: Does soda really damage your teeth? If so, which kinds (cola, root beer etc.) cause the most damage? | Answerbag

I'm sure you know that your favorite fizzy sugary elixir is not doing a thing for your waistline, but did you also know it's rotting your teeth? You might think it is the sugar, but you would be wrong. Sodas rank high in acidity, and when it comes to your mouth, that acidity can speed up the development of cavities. Here's the deal. Teeth become susceptible to cavities when the acid level of your saliva falls below a certain point. If the acid level stays below this point for an extended period of time (like if you are drinking soda all day), the outer layers of your teeth begin to lose minerals and a cavity can form. The phosphoric acid in soda (which is no good for your bones as well), which is what keeps it nice and bubbly, dissolves the calcium out of your teeth's enamel, leaving them soft and unprotected. Sugar-free sodas aren't the answer, since they still contain the same amount of damaging phosphoric acid. Fit's Tips: When it comes to your teeth, the worst thing you can do is to sip soda throughout the day. If you're not ready to give soda up completely, try and drink it at one sitting with a meal, and when you're done, immediately rinse with water.

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Tooth decay is the destruction of the enamel (outer surface) of a tooth. Tooth decay is also known as dental cavities or dental caries. Decay is caused by bacteria that collect...
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