Science Lab 1

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 128
  • Published : February 17, 2015
Open Document
Text Preview
 
 

 
 
 
 
Animal and Plant Cell 
Comparison Lab 
 
 
 
 
 
 
By: Hamiz Jamil 
Daniel Levin 
Justin Mackeigan 
Arash Kamali 
 
 
Science 8C1 
Due Date: Thursday November, 20th 

Table of Contents  
 
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Background Information……………………………...page 3  Purpose………………………………………………...page 3  Hypothesis……………………………………………..page 3  Materials………………………………………………..page 4  Procedure……………………………………………....page 4­5  Observation/Diagrams………………………………...page 5­7  Conclusion……………………………………………...page 7  Discussion……………………………………………...page 8­9 

Background Information 
 
All living  organisms  are  made  up  of  cells, (Humans,  plants,  etc).  Without cells, humans  couldn’t  function. There are over 37 trillion cells in the human body, and each cell needs  every  single  organelle  within  it  to  function,  if  one  stops  working,  the  entire  cell  would  stop  working.  The  Animal  cell  has  a  very  irregular  shape,  and  the  Plant  cell  has  a  regular  shape  (rectangle),  and  are  extremely  similar,  the  plant  cell  just  has a few more  organelles,  like  the  cell  wall  (which  provides  extra  protection  for  the  cell  because  the  plant  cell  needs  it),  and  the  chloroplasts  (which makes the  food  for the  plant).  Animal  cells  generally  tend  to  be smaller than plant cells. Both cells are vital for us in our day  to  day  lives,  because  without  plant  cells, there  would be no  plant  life,  and without  animal  cells, there would be no humans.  

 
Purpose

 

 
The purpose of this lab was to analyze and compare human cheek cells, onion cells,  and various plant cells such as thin slices of carrots, mushrooms, celery and cucumber. 

 
Hypothesis  
 
If  we  compare  the  cells  of  onions  (plant  cell)  and  the  human  cheek  (animal  cell),  we  believe  that  we will  see the  formation of  each.  We  hope to  see  the  different  organelles  and the layout of the cell as well as the structure. 

 

 
 
 

Materials  
­Onion
 
­Human Cheek Cell
­Mushroom 
­Carrot
­Redpepper
­Celery
­Cucumber
­Safety Goggles 
 

Procedure

­Tweezers 
­Toothpick 
­Microscope/Electronic Microscope 
­Microscope Slides 
­Cover Slips  
­Lens Paper 
­Paper Towel  

 

Onion 
1. Remove 2cm from the onion 
2. Place the onion skin in the centre of the slide   3. Place a coverslip on top Look at it under the microscope  4. Take a picture 
 
Cheek Cells 
1. Scrape inner cheek with toothpick  
2. Smear it on the slide  
3. Look at it under the microscope  
4. Take a picture 
 
Carrot 
1. Get a thin slice of a carrot 
2. Place it on the slide  
3. Look at it under the microscope 
4. Take a picture 
 
Celery 
1. Get a thin slice of celery 
2. Place it on the slide 
3. Look at it under the microscope 
4. Take a picture  
 
 

Mushroom 
1. Get a thin slice of mushroom 
2. Place it on the slide  
3. Look at it under the microscope 
4. Take a picture 
 

Observations 
Throughout the experiment we ran a series of tests consisting of Cheek cells, Onions,  Red Bell Peppers, Cucumber, Celery, Carrots and Mushrooms. The observations are as  following: 
 
Onion 
The sample of Onion was filled with cells formed in arrays. Each cell has nucleus’s  showing scattered differently throughout each onion cell. Each cell is packed tightly with  the next, and there are clear cell membranes as well as cytoplasms. The sample was  moist with clear lines going through the thin layer of onion. This sample in particular had  a pungent odour 

to it.  

 
Cheek Cell 
The Cheek Cell Sample was coated in saliva with pink spots sprawled across the  cytoplasm. The cells itself is rounded off in various ways along the cell membrane while  there are lines going throughout the cell. There is a nucleus in the middle of the cell and ...
tracking img