School of Unspeakable

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Q 1:
The story For the Blood is the Life, by F. Marion Crawford, consists of two frames. The first frame is the present, and the second story is somebody’s adventure, and the two have a connection. There are two characters in the first frame: the narrator and Hoag. In the second frame there are 5 main characters: Alario, Angelo, Antonio, Cristina, and the Priest. In my opinion, the connection between the two stories is that the narrator is Antonio, because of number of reasons. Forst of all, the narrator does not have a name, that is a hint from the author. Another reason is that the narrator know the story too well, only somebody who has been around during the adventure happening could recall it in such great detail. Alario could not be the narrator because he passed away; Cristina was killed, and she was a woman; Angelo went to South America and never came back. The narrator could only be either Antonio or the priest. The author’s last sentence in the story is : “Antonio is as grey as a badger, and he has never been quite the same man since that night” (312 p 202). The sentence is very suspicious because the narrator says it to the readers, and not to his friend Hoag, therefore suggesting that Antonio is a more significant character that it seems. Q 2:

The School for the Unspeakable by Manly Wade Wellman has a very interesting fictional ending. There were 4 vampires: Hoag, Andoff, and Feltcher, and their master. Collins, the current master of the school, explained that “the headmaster went mad and killed three of his pupils” (Wellman, p 308). In my opinion, the previous master was a vampire, and infected the three pupils. It explains what Felcher said to Setwick: “nobody could kill us, not after the oaths we’d taken, and promises that had been made us” (Wellman p 307). When the three kids try to suck the blood out of Setwick, their master prevents them, saying to Setwick: “run you, get out of here – and thank God for the chance” (Wellman, p 309). It turns...
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