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1.Define and discuss the term "collective bargaining." Include and discuss [showing relevance or applicability] at least one reference found in our text, along with a current web-based news item/magazine article about a real life example of a collective bargaining action. Write a succinct and complete summary on the contents of the article you've provided along with your critical comments about that article. Support your findings with referenced research. (5 points) Collective bargaining is the term that relates to negotiations between and employers and a group of employees in which the terms and conditions of the employment are decided. The result of collective bargaining procedures is a collective agreement. Employees are often represented in bargaining by a union or other labor organization. Major subjects of bargaining include: compensation, personnel policies and procedures, employee rights and responsibilities, employer rights and responsibilities, union rights and responsibilities, and dispute resolution and ongoing decision making (Labor Relations Book 13). The article I read was about whether public employees should have collective bargaining. The battle in Wisconsin is about the appropriateness of collective bargaining rights in the public sector. “In the private sector collective bargaining is used to equalize the power of employees and employers.” They didn’t have to fear dismissal simply because of seeking higher wages or better conditions. In 1962 the federal government gave collective bargaining rights to federal employees, and in 1977 California did the same. Collective bargaining for public employees in California changed the balance of power and gave public employees power over their compensation and benefits. “In short, the more state revenues are directed to employee compensation and benefits for public employees, the less those revenues are available for private-sector union workers building infrastructure, students paying tuition and...