Scales of Justice

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Scales of Justice shows a police force where there is a culture of corruption. The parts of the TV program that we saw were made up of two parts, The Job, and the Game. The Job is about a new probationary officer named Webber, and how he is forced to accept the corruption that occurs in the force, and ends up getting fired. The Game takes corruption to a new level involving higher powers such as MP's and non-uniformed officers. They both are good examples of how it is a culture for them.

The corruption that occurs in the Job is nothing unusual or abnormal, even to some of the higher ranked officers. Much of it involves accepting small bribes and breaching the code of conduct that is involved in being a policeman. For example, on more than on occasion, Sergeant Borland drinks and smokes while he is on duty. He then ended up influencing the new officer, Webber, to drink on duty. There is also an instance where Borland was offered an insufficient bribe so he locked the guy up and took him to court. He then influenced Webber to testify and say that he saw the man offer the bribe, which he didn't see.

Many times it is shown that officers avoid crime because there is too much paperwork to go with it. While Webber and Borland were on duty, the saw a moving car collide with a parked car, and Webber was told to do a U-turn. This was because if they caught the guy that did it, they would have to do several hours of paperwork. There was also a scene in the show when Borland told Webber about a time he found a corpse in a river, and they dumped in back inside because it would be too much of a hassle dealing with it.

Accepting kickbacks is another small manner of corruption that occur in the police force. Sergeant O'Rourke influenced a lady to choose a funeral parlour, while she was mourning and unstable. He would then get paid a small finder's fee for getting customers for company. Then there was also a time where Borland favoured a tow truck company...
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