Saxonville Case Study

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  • Topic: Sausage, Brand, Mother
  • Pages : 5 (1504 words )
  • Download(s) : 39
  • Published : February 10, 2013
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Saxonville
1.
The research design taught Saxonville a lot about their consumers’ core values and desires, however it took a very long to implement and may have contained some bias components. The first phase of the research educated Saxonville employees about their target markets. They realized that their primary consumers are women aged 20-50 who cook dinner for their family. Although it was good to research and make sure that mothers were the primary buyers and cooks, Saxonville could have easily assumed this information. Additionally, they picked many of their participants through cold calling, which is not always the best option. Also, the first session was held in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Although I am unsure of where they held all of the other focus group sessions, I believe that if they wanted to sell their products nationally, they should go to other parts of the United States where they do not already sell their product. Since they mostly sell Vivio on the east coast, they should already have a good handle on their east coast consumers’ needs. Now they need to figure out if consumers in the rest of the country have the same needs, or different needs due to cultural changes. Other than women being the primary purchasers of Italian sausage, the research taught us that most women wish to cook a home cooked meal that the whole family will enjoy. A lot of women see time and skill as a tradeoff and don’t always have the time to make great meals for the family, while still enjoying their family’s company. Additionally, women feel very good about themselves when the whole family enjoys their meal, but they ultimately fear a meal disaster. They want to be remembered for more than just doing laundry and nagging, and wish to make the dinner experience both valuable and memorable. Most people loved Italian sausage because it was quick, easy, and could be used in a variety of different dishes. According to exhibit 9, consumers felt that “Family Connection” was most important, but that “Clever Cooking,” was another great option. They also learned that Vivio was considered to be an exceptional brand by loyalists and competitive users alike. Overall I think that the research did a good job of understanding mothers’ wants and needs for the dinner experience. However, I wonder how many of their consumers aren’t mothers and what their primary reasons are for using Italian sausage. 2.

“Family Connection”
Value:| Making home-cooked food they all will love while facilitating the family experience| Emotional Benefit:| Makes me feel great because the whole family enjoys the dinner| FunctionalBenefit:| Brings everyone to the table with no complaints, acts like a magnet| Attributes:| Fresh and High quality ingredientsProduces a delicious sent Variety of Flavors|

“Clever Cooking”
Value:| Using creativity to come up with a variety of interesting and delicious meals| Emotional Benefit:| Makes the mother feel like a better chef because she can easily make many great delicious dishes.| FunctionalBenefit:| Easy to make a variety of different meals in a matter of minutes. More time for the mother to spend with her family. | Attributes:| Fresh and High quality ingredientsVariety of FlavorsDifferent forms, for both adults and childrenRecipes on packaging/OnlineSuggestions of what to mix sausage with|

By comparing these two ladders, it is clear that “Clever Cooking” has more attributes that can communicate the benefits to the customers. The “Family Connection” concept depends much more on a mother’s emotions, and therefore may be harder to convey to the public.

Chart:
| “Family Connection”| “Clever Cooking”|
Brand Name| Vivio | Vivio|
Tag Line| “The minute they smell it, they’ll have to have some”| “Delicious creative meals in minutes!”|

I believe that no matter what Saxonville should stick to the brand name Vivio. Although many say that the name doesn’t sound Italian enough,...
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