Savoring, Life Satisfaction & Happiness

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Does Amplifying Savoring and Life Satisfaction Lead to Happiness? Name: xxxxxx
Course: xxxx
Institution: xxx

Abstract
In this paper, we focus on some of the ideas that a new field of psychology known as “positive psychology” is looking into, how amplifying savoring and life satisfaction can improve people’s overall happiness. Bryant and Veroff (2007) found that savoring is a process where people are aware of pleasure and appreciate the positive experience in their life, which increases happiness. We looked at ta total of 290 university students who completed questionnaires about their ways of savoring, life satisfaction and subjective happiness. Results show that amplifying savoring, life satisfaction and happiness were significantly and positively correlated. It was also seen that amplifying savoring mediated the relationship between life satisfaction and happiness. Basically, our findings suggest that happy people become satisfied with life not because they feel good but because they have developed strategies for living well (Cohn, Fredrickson, Brown, Mikels & Conway, 2009).  

Does Amplifying Savoring and Life Satisfaction Lead to Happiness?
Research in the field of positive psychology have increasingly focused on studying things that make life worth living and looking at the good and positive things in life. Goal of positive psychology is to find ways of improving people’s lives and enhancing their well—being for future socio—emotional development (Dunn, Beard, & Fisher, 2011). Some of the ways people’s lives can be improved and enhanced is through contentment, hope, life satisfaction and happiness (Csizentmihalyi & Seligam, 2000).

According to Bryant and Veroff (2007), savoring is a way of appreciating, enhancing, and attending to the positive experiences that people have and think of savoring as a blessing to positively fulfilling one’s life. With the positive psychology movement, many researchers have started looking at ways of maintaining and increasing happiness and life satisfaction (Cohn & Fredrickson, 2010; Schueller, 2010; Sheldon & Lyubomirsky, 2006; Sin & Lyubomirsky, 2009, as cited in Jose, Lim & Bryant, 2012). The efficacy of savoring has been positively correlated with life satisfaction and happiness (Bryant, 2003; Bryant & Veroff, 2007, p. 184; Quoidbach, Berry, Hansen, & Mikolajczak, 2010).

In the present study, we look at one of the forms of savoring responses that will amplify positive reactions and emotions to positive events, called amplifying savoring (the other being dampening savoring; Jose, Lim & Bryant, 2012). Four types of amplifying strategies that prolong positive experiences were identified by Quoidbach et al. (2010) as follows: behavioral display; attention to the present pleasant experience; capitalizing; and positive mental time travel. Happiness is a feeling characterized by pleasure or satisfaction (Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, 2008, as cited in Lin, Lin, & Wu, 2010). Happiness is considered to be a multidimensional construct made up of the affective component; frequency and degree of joy and absence of negative feelings, and the cognitive component; average level of satisfaction (Stewart, Watson, Clark, Ebmeier & Deary, 2010). Three primary paths to happiness have been identified and are as follows: experiencing many of life’s pleasures as possible; being deeply involved and losing oneself in activities that one excels in; and pursuing a path in which there is a sense of commitment to something greater than oneself (Seligman, 2002, as cited in Bronk, Hill, Lapsley, Talib, & Finch, 2009). Experiencing positive emotions and using resources such as savoring can help people meet life’s challenges and opportunities, giving rise to life satisfaction and an overall sense of happiness (Cohn et al., 2009). The goal of the current study was to examine the relationship among and between amplifying savoring, life satisfaction and happiness. We used a survey...
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