Sasasa

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Sasasa

By | March 2008
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The following is taken from Research Methods for Business Students (3rd Edition) by M. Saunders, P Lewis and A Thornhill, published by FT Prentice Hall, 2003.

Table A2.1 Using the Harvard System to reference in the text To refer toUse the general formatFor example
A single author(Surname date)(Saunders 1993)
Dual authors(Surname and Surname date)(Saunders and Cooper 1993) More than two authors(Surname et al. date)(Slack et al. 1996) Work by different authors generally(Surname date; Surname date) in alphabetical order(Baker 1996; Lewis 1998; Thornhill 1997) Different authors with the same surname(Surname, Initial date)(Smith, J 1998) Different publications by the same author (Surname date; date) in ascending date order (Lewis 1991; 1998) Different publications by the same author from the same year(Surname date letter), make sure the letter is consistent throughout(Forster 1991a) An author referred to by another author where the original has not been read (secondary reference)(Surname date; cited by Surname date)(Granovetter 1974; cited by Saunders 1993) A corporate author(Corporate name date)(Hanson Trust plc 1990 A Newspaper article with no obvious author(Newspaper name date)(The Guardian 2002) Another type of publication with no obvious author(Publication title date)(Labour Market Trends 2001) An Internet site(Site title date)(Advertising Association 1999) A publication for which the year of publication cannot be identified(Surname or Corporate name nd), where ‘nd’ means no date (Surname or Corporate name, c. date) where ‘c’ means circa(Woollons nd)

(Hattersley c. 1977)
A direct quotation(Surname or Corporate name date, p. number) where ‘p’ means ‘page’ and number is the page in the original publication on which the quotation appears‘The Harvard method, which I use in this book, has a number of advantages over other methods’ (Bell 1999, p. 51)

Table A2.2 Using the Harvard System to reference in the references or...