Sand Dust Storm in China

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  • Topic: Storm, Dust storm, Dust
  • Pages : 6 (1322 words )
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  • Published : March 25, 2013
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Global Conference on Natural Disasters |
Sand dust storm in China
|
Focus on China |

|

Contents
1.0 Introduction2
2.0 Sand Dust Storm in China2
2.1 Definition2
2.2 Location2
2.3 When did it happen?2
2.4 What caused the event?2
2.5 What areas were affected?2
3.0 Effects and Damage of Sand Dust Storm2
3.1 Short and long term effects2
3.2 Extent of the Damage2
4.0 Historic Records and Extent of effects of Sand Dust Storm2
4.1 Historic Records of Sand Dust Storm in Beijing2
4.2 Main damage ways of Sand Dust Storm2
4.3 Damage of Sand Dust Storm2
5.0 Prevention and Positive effects of Sand Dust Storm2
5.1 Causes of Sand Dust storm2
5.2 Prevention2
5.3 Positive outcomes from the disaster2
6.0 The End2
Conclusion2
Recommendations2
Reference list2

1.0 Introduction

This report is authorised by the attending of a global conference on natural disasters. It focuses on one of main problems of China and uses a descriptive statistical method to analyse the historical overview of global natural disasters to ascertain the influence of sand dust storm on China.

2.0 Sand Dust Storm in China

2.1 Definition

“A sand storm is basically a wind storm that carries sand through the air, forming a relatively low cloud near the ground” (Coenraads 2006, 234). “Most sandstorms occur in the sandy areas of deserts. Some occur on beaches; dry riverbeds; or deposits of gravel, sand, and silt called alluvial fans” (Dirks 2010, 110).

“Dust storms form in semi-arid and arid regions where small dust and sand particles are blown into the air” (Coenraads 2006, 234). “A dust storm may occur hundreds of miles and rise to a height of more than 305 meters. It carries as much as 875 metric tons of dust particles per cubic kilometre of air” (Dirks 2010, 392).

2.2 Location

Strong dust storms hit Xinjiang Autonomous Region, Inner Mongolia, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Hebei, Beijing, Hong Kong and Taiwan. (2010 China drought and dust storms 2010)

2.3 When did it happen?

It happened on March 22, 2010. (2010 China drought and dust storms 2010)

2.4 What caused the event?

Beijing meteorological offices director GuoHu said, “This influence of Beijing's dust source is in Mongolia and in middle Inner Mongolia region. The dust was wafted from thousands of meters altitude by the conveying of strong winds. From the perspective of meteorology, this is unstoppable climate phenomena” (Xinhua NET 2010).

2.5 What areas were affected?

The other areas were affected where were “South Korea, North Korea and Japan by March 22, before being carried across the Pacific Ocean by the jet stream, with some dust reaching the West Coast of the United States” (2010 China drought and dust storms 2010).

3.0 Effects and Damage of Sand Dust Storm

3.1 Short and long term effects

“The dust storm in late March spiralled around a strong low pressure system. Many areas recorded an extremely rare level 5 "hazardous" rating for air quality. Many flights in Beijing were also delayed or cancelled. Air pollution readings in Hong Kong reached a record high, reaching at least 15 times the recommended maximum levels by the World Health Organization. Taiwan also reported a new record for worst sandstorm conditions. A strong sandstorm tore through Turpan in Xinjiang on April 23, sparking fires that killed two people and forcing a shutdown of rail and road traffic for six hours” (2010 China drought and dust storms 2010).

3.2 Extent of the Damage

According to the news releases of the state forestry administration desertification monitoring centre of China on March 28 2010, Extent of the Damage of Sand Dust Storm affected 304 counties of 11 provinces and the air of 6 key cities was severely Polluted. The affected area is about 1.20 square kilometres, the affected population is about 70 million people, and cultivated land area was affected more than 6.4 million hectares, garden area was...
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