Sampling and Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion

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Sampling and Measures of Central Tendency and Dispersion

Introduction: Overall Job Satisfaction (OJS) was the variable selected for this exercise because it lends itself to measures of central tendency and dispersion. The data are quantitative and continuous in nature.

Data Selected: The instructions for the exercise suggested a sample of approximately 30 individuals from one of eight variables. There were 288 measures of OJS. Every ninth individual was selected resulting in thirty-two (32) unique scores. The data was sorted by gender (17 males, 15 females) as shown in the following table:

GENDERAGEDEPTPOSITIONTENUREOVERALLINTRINSICEXTRINSIC
123211.62.674
133131.85.335.5
123113.45.332
1332145.56
1132145.336.5
123234.43.336
123214.45.676
123114.66.173
123114.84.336
1331156.177
123135.456
133115.45.676.5
132116.24.834
133116.256
13322756
12311777
1232176.836
222112.211
233132.44.336
223222.662
223233.236
212223.667
211223.856
223234.45.57
222124.654
223124.64.176.5
223114.85.56
222214.86.335
222115.45.674
222235.665
222115.84.175
2111166.676

Measures of Central Tendency:

4.56mean
4.6median
4.4, 4.6mode note: software did not identify 4.8,5.4,7

Measures of Dispersion:

6range
2.137variance
1.462standard deviation
1.129mean deviation

Discussion: Microsoft Excel software was used for all calculations.

The arithmetic mean (average) was calculated to be 4.56. It is understood that this measure of central tendency is affected by extreme scores.

The median (middle value) for this even numbered sample of 32 is 4.6. This value suggests that the mean is being affected by scores indicating some degree of dissatisfaction.

The distribution of the data in...
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