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Sample College Essay

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The summer I was nine, I found out exactly what I didn’t want to become. It was 2003, the US launched an immoral war on Iraq, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix was released, and the Staten Island ferry crashed, killing eleven people. For a third grader, it was a lot to process. I remember crying over the lost lives, sitting on the edge of my seat at the movies, and being utterly confused as to why we were going to war. Didn’t President Bush know that we would only be killing more people? The fall of the twin towers two years ago was still fresh in my mind, so I knew that the country was hurting, but I also knew that now even more lives would be lost. So curious and upset, I asked my dad what was wrong with the government.

My dad wasn’t one to sugar-coat things, not even to his naïve nine year old daughter. Maybe it wouldn’t have been so bad, but my dad was completely anti-government. Not that he believed that we, as humans, would be better off left on our own, but he used every chance he got to bad-mouth the politicians in charge of running our society. He thought he had it all figured out. Too much History Channel, and he was convinced that our country was just one big conspiracy. Of course, now he had to pass this wisdom down to me.

He sat me down across from him, looked me in the eye, and talked for two hours straight. He told me that everything I knew was a lie, that our freedom was barely there, that we were brain washed…by the time he was done, I couldn’t even get up. I wasn’t sure if it was because now my head was full of terrifying knowledge, or if somewhere down the line, both of my legs had fallen asleep and I hadn’t even noticed.

Even at nine years old, I knew instinctively not to trust everything my dad had just told me. However, his words left a deep impression in me, and I knew then that I would never, ever get involved with politics, or anything like law and government. However, my father’s rant taught me something invaluable. From...