Salt Diffusion Lab

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Effect of Temperature on Salt Diffusion Rates and it’s Relation to the Human Body

Hypothesis:
Ordinary table salt is known to dissolve easily in water. Dissolving or diffusion is the spreading of particles in another substance. This is seen when smoke from a chimney diffuses in the air around it, or when dropping coloring in water. When NaCl, sodium chloride, or otherwise known as ordinary table salt is combined with water the separate salt and water molecules will be attracted to each other and break bonds causing the salt to dissolve. So what role does the temperature of the solvent play on the rate of the salt diffusing? Hypothesis: As the temperature of the solvent is increased, the rate of dissolving will follow suit and increase. They can be said to be positively correlated. This hypothesis is stated on the grounds that at higher temperatures there is more kinetic energy and the molecules bounce around more. This directly means that there will be more space between the molecules and will therefore be easier for them to dissolve. And since it is easier for the salt to dissolve it should naturally do so at a faster rate. Approximately sixty percent of the human body comprises of water. Therefore the rate of salt dissolving in a human’s body can be affected by the body temperature of the individual. Another important fact to consider is that salt affects the rate that water exchange between human cells and the fluids surrounding it takes place.

Purpose:
The purpose of this experiment is to test the time it takes for salt to dissolve in water with varying temperatures. The amount of water will be kept at a constant, as will the amount of salt used. A timer will be used to record the times.

Objective:
Determine the influence of temperature on the rate of salt diffusion in water.

Materials:
• A timer
• Stirring rod
• 100 grams of table salt
• Three 150ml beakers
• Microwave
• Thermometer measuring degrees Celsius...
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