Salient Features of Romanticism

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3(a) Discuss the salient features of Romanticism.
Romanticism is a movement in art and literature in the eighteenth and nineteenth century in revolt against the neo-classicism of the previous centuries. It is the direct outcome of French Revolution. The French Revolution directly inspired by Rousseauism, had its influence on the Romantic Poets, both in its revolutionary ideals and in its excess of terror. This imaginative literature of the early nineteenth century found its creative impulse in the sociological ideal.

Romanticism is a contrary to the neo-classicism. Neo-classicism can be characterized by emotional resistant, order and logic while romanticism gives emphasis over imagination. The romantics write what they get from their imagination. The romantics tried to see life with new sensibilities and fresh visions. They are deeply aware of their social obligations, but the burden of an exception vision of life drives them into being almost fugitives from their fellow-men. The romantic poets lead the readers to the strange areas of human experience, but seldom welcome him in the language of ordinary conversations, or even with currency of normality.

Romanticism started its journey in English Literature wit the publication of Lyrical Ballads, a joint work of Wordsworth and Coleridge in 1798. Its communion with nature, interest in simple human life, profound impulsiveness, imaginative propensity and lyrical subjectivity are its salient features.

Romantic age is essentially an age of verse. The spirit of romanticism is found primarily struck in poetry in the liberation of poetic inspiration and impulses. This dominant of poetry is found echoed in words worth’s famous saying, “Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge. As Wordsworth puts it, poetry is a “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.”While Blake thought that poetry comes from inspiration, vision and prophecy. Keats said that poetry should come “as naturally as the leaves of a...
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