Safety of Teens on the Road: Raising the Driving Age from Sixteen to Eight-Teen Speech

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Monday, August 23, 2010:

Adam London, age 17, captain of the lacrosse team and student body president, should be a senior looking forward to graduating high school with his twin sister, Lizzy. He should be getting ready for college. He should have a future. He does not. Adam died in a car collision when he stuck a tree at sixty-three mph in a forty mph zone, while it was pouring rain. Although his father constantly warned him against speeding, he did not heed this warning. Adam had a bright future to look forward to, but sadly he was even able to see his eighteenth birthday.

Just like Adam many drivers never come home. Out of the entire driving population 10 percent are teenagers, just like Adam, between 16 and 17 years-of-age, and just this 10 percent is responsible for $19 billion or 30% among males and $7 billion or 28% among females for the total costs of motor vehicle injuries. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens in the U.S. Teenagers have these car crashes due factors such as immaturity, high risk maneuvers, drinking, and distraction from teen passenger, and the underestimation of hazardous situations on the road such as black ice and wet roads, and by raising the driving age from 16 years-of-age to 18 years-of-age the numbers of teen drivers would go way down and potentially the numbers of fatal car crashes would also. Compared to 18 year olds, 16 and 17 year olds have a crash rate three times higher. This is part of the reason why all teen drivers are assumed to be so dangerous.

Danger doesn’t even being to speak when teens speed. Speeding is the one of the top killers in teen car accidents. Along with speeding, teens have the lowest rate of seatbelt usage, which plays a role in the horrific fatal car crashes. Male high school students compared to female high school students are more likely to wear their seatbelts rarely or never, which can certainly pose a problem when your brakes go out or you lose...
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