Safety Measures in Factory

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Occupational safety and health
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"Occupational hazard" redirects here. For for the Unsane album, see Occupational Hazard. | This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2010) |

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The labour movement[show] * Timeline * New Unionism * Proletariat * Social Movement Unionism * Socialism * Syndicalism * Anarcho-syndicalism| Labour rights[hide] * Child labour * Eight-hour day * Collective bargaining * Occupational safety and health| Trade unions[show] * Trade unions by country * Trade union federations * International comparisons * ITUC * IWA * WFTU| Strike action[show] * Chronological list of strikes * General strike * Secondary action * Sitdown strike * Work-to-rule| Labour parties[show] * Labour Party (UK) * Labour Party (Ireland) * Australian Labor Party * New Zealand Labour Party * List of other Labour parties| Academic disciplines[show] * Industrial relations * Labour economics * Labour history * Labour law| * v * t * e|

Occupational safety and health (OSH) is a cross-disciplinary area concerned with protecting the safety, health and welfare of people engaged in work or employment. The goals of occupational safety and health programs include to foster a safe and healthy work environment.[1] OSH may also protect co-workers, family members, employers, customers, and many others who might be affected by the workplace environment. Occupational safety and health can be important for moral, legal, and financial reasons. All organisations have a duty of care to ensure that employees and any other person who may be affected by the companies undertaking remain safe at all times.[2] Moral obligations would involve the protection of employee's lives and health. Legal reasons for OSH practices relate to the preventative, punitive and compensatory effects of laws that protect worker's safety and health. OSH can also reduce employee injury and illness related costs, including medical care, sick leave and disability benefit costs. OSH may involve interactions among many subject areas, including occupational medicine, occupational hygiene, public health, safety engineering, industrial engineering, chemistry, health physics, ergonomics and occupational health psychology. Contents [hide]  * 1 Definition * 2 Workplace hazards * 2.1 Physical and mechanical hazards * 2.2 Biological and chemical hazards * 2.2.1 Biological hazards * 2.2.2 Chemical hazards * 2.3 Psychological and social issues * 3 Occupational safety and health by industry * 3.1 Construction * 3.2 Agriculture * 3.3 Service sector * 4 Workplace fatalities statistics * 4.1 European Union * 4.2 United States * 5 History * 6 Management systems * 6.1 International * 6.2 United Kingdom * 7 National legislation and public organizations * 7.1 European Union * 7.2 United Kingdom * 7.3 Denmark * 7.4 United States * 7.5 Canada * 7.6 Malaysia * 7.7 People's Republic of China * 7.8 South Africa * 8 Roles and responsibilities of OSH professionals * 8.1 Europe * 8.2 USA * 9 Differences across countries and regions * 10 Identifying safety and health hazards * 10.1 Hazards, risks, outcomes * 10.2 Hazard assessment * 10.3 Risk assessment * 11 Contemporary developments * 11.1 Nanotechnology * 12 Occupational health psychology * 13...
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