Safety Measures

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39 Safety Measures in Factories

39.1 Introduction
Increasing number of accidents involving workers has drawn our attention towards safety measures in the factories. Accidents not only affect workers loosing their livelihood but also employers in terms of compensation to be paid to the workers. Accidents are a significant cause of dispute between workers and management. With the coming in of new set up of industries e.g., steel production, engineering, fertilizers, chemicals and petro-chemicals, oil refining etc., and increasing use of machine power, industrial complexities in terms of process of production have increased. This has given rise to hazards and risks. Safety measures are to be adopted against such risks and hazards. The Factories Act, 1948 has laid down certain measures for the safety of workers employed in the factories. In this lesson, we shall study about the safety measures in factories.

39.2 Objectives
After studying this lesson, you will be able to: • • • explain the need for adopting safety measures in factories; describe the safety measures provided for in the Factories Act; understand the relationship between safety measures and efficiency of workers.

Safety Measures in Factories ::25

39.3 Need for safety measures
Safety measures result in improving the conditions under which workers are employed and work. It improves not only their physical efficiency, but also provides protection to their life and limb. Inadequate provision of safety measures in factories may lead to increase in the number of accidents. Human failure due to carelessness, ignorance, inadequate skill, and improper supervision have also contributed to accidents, and the consequent need for safety measures. Other factors giving rise to the need for safety measures are: — rapid industrialization with its complexities in manufacturing process and layout; expansion or modifications in existing factories; setting up of new industries involving hazards not known earlier; lack of safety consciousness on the part of both workers and management; inadequate realisation of the financial implications of accidents.

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Intext Questions 39.1
1. State which of the following statement are true and which are false: (i) Safety measures only improve physical efficiency of workers. Inadequate provision of safety measures in factories gives rise to increase in number of accident.

(ii)

2.

Fill in the blanks as directed: (i) Factors giving rise to the need for safety measures are ______ (mention any two factors)

26 :: Commerce (Business Studies)

(ii)

_____ result in improving the conditions under which workers are employed and work in factories. (fill in the gap with appropriate words) Rapid industrialisation with its complexities in manufacturing process has given rise to __________. (fill in the gap with appropriate expression).

(iii)

39.4 Safety Measures
Safety measures which are provided in the Factories Act, 1948, are considered to be minimum in terms of adequacy. Such measures are required to be effectively implemented. In addition to implementing safety measures provided in the Factories Act, there is also need for providing training in safety to workers, and installing safety equipment in the factories. Employers should take the initiative in providing training in safety to employees. Workers’ unions should take interest in safety promotion. Periodic training courses in accident prevention can be organised. Safety should become a habit with employers and the workers alike. The Factories Act provides for the following safety measures:—

(i)

Fencing of Machinery
In every factory, measures should be taken for secured fencing of machinery. Safeguards of substantial construction must be raised and constantly maintained and kept in position while the parts of machinery (they are fencing) are in motion or in use. Fencing is necessary in respect of: — — — — — every moving part of a prime mover;...
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