Safeguarding Children

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Understand How to Safeguard the Wellbeing of Children and Young People. Question 1
We use legislation, guidelines and policies and procedures to safeguard children. It is important that we use these guidelines as it does affect the way we treat and protect children in our care. Here are some guidelines, legislations and policies and procedures: * The children Act 1989 for England and Wales

* The children Act 2004
* Children Order 1995 – Northern Ireland
* Working together to Safeguard Children 2006
* Keighley Community Nursery Safeguarding policy
Question 2
Safeguarding is much more than just protecting children from direct abuse. The staying safe action plan recognises a number of important aspects in the wider view of Safeguarding including: * Keeping children safe from accidents

* Crime and bullying
* Forced marriages
* Missing children
* Actively promoting their welfare in a healthy and safe environment Question 3
It is important that anyone working with children should be able to recognise if a child is a t risk of harm or in need because of their vulnerability. The earlier this is recognised, the better the outcome for the child. Any childcare setting should have clear policies and procedures that cover all aspects of safeguarding. This should include policies for: * Health and safety

* Child protection
* Contact with children and performing personal care
* Outings
* Visitors to the setting
* Risk assessments
All settings working with children must have the following:
* A policy for the protection of children under the age 18 that is reviewed annually. * Arrangements to liaise with the Local Safeguarding Children Board. * A duty to inform the Independent Safeguarding Authority of any individual (paid employee, volunteer, or other) who poses a threat to children * Appropriate training on safeguarding for all staff, governors and volunteers, which is regularly updated. * Training for all staff, governors and volunteers working with children under age 18 to recognise signs of abuse, and how to respond to disclosures from children. * A named senior member of staff in charge of safeguarding arrangements who has been trained to the appropriate level. * Effective risk assessments of the provision to check that the safeguarding policy and plans work. * Arrangements for checks, including CRB, on all staff who have regular, unsupervised access to children up to the age 18, and where appropriate for governors and volunteers. * A single, central record of all checks on provider staff – governors and volunteers require clearance if they have frequent or intensive contact with the children. * Contact details for a parent or carer and for all children under 18. We have these guidelines and policies and procedures to make sure we carry out our jobs as effectively as we can. It also helps us to go the correct ways in protecting and safeguarding children in our care. Question 4

All too often children die or are seriously injured because of abuse or avoidable accidents. If we suspect any sort of abuse in our setting we would have to follow the correct procedures. I would firstly report any concerns to my manager, who would then decide what actions need to be taken. Serious case reviews like the Laming Inquiry, the Bichard Inquiry and Baby P are instigated in exceptional circumstances, when there has been: * A breakdown in communication

* Not sharing information
* Not keeping accurate timelines of events
* No clear planning and roles
* Relations with hard to reach families.
The result of these reviews are shared and used as examples when the safeguarding system clearly hasn’t worked although they can be used to create new guidelines to safeguard children. Question 5

Everyone has a right to their data being totally confidential by The Data Protection Act 1998. Any business holds a huge amount of information about its...
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