Rrl of My Classmte as Example

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  • Topic: Ultraviolet, Sunlight, Sunscreen
  • Pages : 10 (3167 words )
  • Download(s) : 250
  • Published : December 16, 2010
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Product: Ray-Ban


Various eye problems have been associated with overexposure to sunlight.

Ultraviolet Ray

People are unaware of what UVR can cause to their vision/eye sight.

Insufficient spread of information to the public.

Sub Problem

How can we completely inform the public about the dangers caused by the UVR?


Another radiation from the sun can harm not only your skin but also your eyes. Extended exposure to the sun’s UV rays has been linked to eye damage, which includes the cataract that clouds the eye’s natural lens that can cause to temporary vision loss.

The purpose of this project is to make the public aware of what UV ray can cause to their vision. To protect the eyes from harmful solar radiation, sunglasses should block 100 percent of UV rays. A good quality of sunglasses such as Ray-Ban is a certified item for consumption that manufactures variety of glasses and likewise lenses that deals with overexposure to sun.

This variety of lenses indicates the amount of protection it can give to the eyes. It includes the tints in the lenses that keep UV ray from reaching the eyes. Manufacturers add certain colors that block UVB light. Amber and brown tints are especially useful at absorbing UV light; however, any light-blocking tint will help prevent eye damage. Manufacturers either use colored glass or polycarbonates to make these lenses or soak polycarbonate lenses in a tint solution. Sunglasses can also have extra UV coating, although these aren't necessarily just for sunglasses, as the coatings are clear and can be applied to regular glasses.

The best tint for optimizing performance is a matter of personal preference. Sunglasses labeled "UV-400" should offer good protection from the sun. One easy way to keep your eyes protected is to remember to push your sunglasses up on your nose---the closer the lenses are to the eye, the more protection you get. If you're going to be in a high-sun environment, wrap-around shades are a good choice.


Most people know of the dangers of the sun to our skin. But many do not know that too much sun can also damage the eyes. Eyes are sensitive instruments which can easily become injured or diseased from exposure to sunlight, because of the ultraviolet (UV) rays of the sun. Ultraviolet rays are high energy, and are invisible to the human eye because they are outside the spectrum of colors that a human eye can see.

Eye diseases are associated with exposure to sunlight
Exposure to sunlight can cause damage to the eyes in both the short and long term. In the short term, exposure to sunlight can result in: * Mild irritation: May cause symptoms such as excessive blinking, swelling or difficulty seeing in strong sunlight. * Photo Keratoconjunctivitis: Photo keratoconjunctivitis is a condition similar to snow blindness or welder's flash burn. It occurs when the sensitive, skin-like tissues of the eyeball become sunburnt. Individuals suffering from the condition are likely to experience severe pain, and possibly temporary blindness, for 12 days. The condition is temporary and will resolve naturally. In the long term, exposure to sunlight is associated with a range of eye diseases, including: * Eye cancer (also known as squamous cell carcinoma of the eye): A rare condition characterised by the growth of cancerous cells on the surface of the eye. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that5070% of eye cancers around the world are caused by sun exposure. The risk of developing eye cancer increases with lifetime exposure to sunlight. The incidence is highest in countries closest to the equator. * Cortical and posterior subcapsular cataract: Cataracts are characterised by the increasing opaqueness of the lens of the eye. It can lead to impaired eye sight and, in severe cases, to blindness. The WHO estimate 5% of cortical cataract disease...
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