Rose Bush Scarlet Letter

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The first chapter of a solid piece of literature often sets the base for the work, as well as giving the reader valuable insight into the setting, and mood of the piece. In the “The Prison Door, the first chapter of The Scarlet Letter, the author’s detail, diction and point of view set the tone and setting for the novel. Through the use of these literary elements, Hawthorne conveys an ominous tone but hopeful tone and a shift from a dreadful setting to a beautiful setting. The opening passage does not only warn and hit to the reader that something isn’t right, it continually displays an unknown that is feared. The author’s diction intensifies the feelings toward the jail, and shows the shift from a dreadful to a beautiful setting. The chapter begins by introducing, “a thong of bearded men in sad-colored garments…assembled in front of a wooden edifice…” The words the author chooses convey a dreadful tone a sad setting. “Sad-colored,” not only tells the coloring of the clothes, but it helps to reveal the sad setting and ominous tone. By taking two completely opposite terms and combining them to make a clean mood, the author manipulates the reader’s senses. Because the reader does not know why the men are standing outside, the diction causes them to worry and feel sorry for the people. As the chapter continues, the author’s diction changes to reveal a more beautiful setting. Sitting on the side of the jail was, “a wild rose-bush…with its delicate gems,” that gave hope to the prisoner as he “went in.” Because the setting of the story changes rather quickly, the ominous tone still remains the same. The fact that the rose-bush is on the side of the jail makes the passage seems mysterious. It makes the reader fear something that is unknown. The author’s detail reinforces the shift in tones and settings. At the end of the chapter, Hawthorne notes that, “in token that “the deep of Nature could pity and be kind to him.” Hawthorne contrasts the ugly, environment with...
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