Rosary Journal Research Paper

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JOHN PAUL THE GREAT CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY

THE ROSARY JOURNAL

SUBMITTED TO
MICHAEL BARBER, PH.D.
IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF
THEO 100-INTRODUCTION TO SCRIPTURE I

BY
DEVANIE COOPER
DECEMBER 7, 2011

Table of Contents
Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………... The Joyful Mysteries ………………………………………………………………………. The Annunciation of Our Lord ……………………………………………………………. The Visitation ……………………………………………………………………………… The Nativity of Jesus ………………………………………………………………………. The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple …………………………………………………... The Finding of Jesus in the Temple ………………………………………………………..

The Luminous Mysteries …………………………………………………………………... The Baptism in the Jordan …………………………………………………………………. Jesus’ Self-manifestation at the Wedding of Cana ………………………………………… The Proclamation of the Kingdom of God ………………………………………………… The Transfiguration ………………………………………………………………………… The Institution of the Eucharist ……………………………………………………………..

The Sorrowful Mysteries …………………………………………………………………… The Agony in the Garden …………………………………………………………………… The Scourging at the Pillar ………………………………………………………………….. The Crowning with Thorns …………………………………………………………………. The Carrying of the Cross …………………………………………………………………... The Crucifixion and Death …………………………………………………………………..

The Glorious Mysteries ……………………………………………………………………... The Resurrection of Our Lord ………………………………………………………………. The Ascension into Heaven …………………………………………………………………. The Descent of the Holy Spirit ……………………………………………………………… The Assumption of Mary …………………………………………………………………… The Coronation of Mary …………………………………………………………………….. 11

Introduction
My first experience with the rosary was when I was a child of about eight. I was given a gold-colored set of rosary beads that had belonged to a deceased relative of mine. The details of who this relative was, how the rosary ended up in my hands, or even what happen to it are all very vague and hazy to me now. I do remember though, very distinctly, sitting in my Protestant grandmother’s kitchen doorway playing around with it in my fingers. I remember trying to figure out what it was. It boggled my mind. It appeared to look like a necklace, but there was another part that hung from it… five beads and a crucifix. I never did come to terms with what it was. No one in family really understood or could explain it to me, but I did have the overcoming sensation that what I was holding was holy in some way. When I announced to my family six years later as a young adult that I was converting to the Catholic Church they, by the grace of the Holy Spirit, decided that they would convert as well. My mother, the day after I announced my decision, went and bought the entire family rosary beads. Having always seen images of Catholics with this devotional item, she assumed this was the “Catholic thing” to have. At this point, my knowledge of the rosary was as vague as the first and last day I had held one when I was eight. My pink rosary beads, gifted to me by her, were my first sacramental. I was so determined to learn to pray on them. It fascinated me. I took it to my room the night I received it, put in an accompanying CD she had bought which taught the rosary, and I learned to pray the prayers and the rosary itself. I learned that the rosary was both mental and vocal prayer. One prayed the prescribed prayers that formed it (the Our Father, the Glory Be, and the consecutive Hail Mary’s) while one meditated on the birth, life, passion and resurrection of our Lord. It was the reliving and praying of the Gospel. As one meditated on each mystery the Blessed Virgin taught one about Christ and what it means to be His disciple. Pope John Paul II wrote, “To recite the Rosary is nothing other than to contemplate with Mary the face of Christ.” The rosary has been, from that moment on, my comfort and strength. I have grown more convinced through study and experience of its power and, I would argue, necessity in...
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