Romulus; Belonging

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Belonging is just as much about exclusion as it is about fitting in. Belonging is a concept wholly linked to the morality and social connections one exercises. These factors foster the sentiments of alienation and acceptance hence showing how belonging is just as much about exclusion than fitting in. It is these factors that derive one’s belonging in society and hence some are excluded naturally. This collated idea is portrayed in Raimond Gaita’s memoir Romulus my father which is supported by George orwell’s 1984. Both texts emphasise the conundrum of belonging and how exclusion can be present with belonging as well as having the ability to fit in. Gaita expresses the irony of belonging in his memoir Romulus my father exposing how morality has an influencing factor in one’s belonging. Furthermore, Romulus’ nationalism for Romania is significant for his lack of belonging for his environment expressed through the line, “He longed for generous and soft European foliage, but the eucalypts of Baringhup, scraggy… seemed symbols of deprivation and barreness.” The lexical change present emphasises Romulus’ alienation as it detracts from the positives of his new nation. This notion is further supported by his underlying desire to always “consider himself Romanian.” The morality of his nationalism therefore causes him to not belong and hence proves how belonging is just as much about exclusion as it is about fitting in. Gaita evidently comments on how belonging of an individual is influenced by their morality and hence showing how exclusion can be a result from morality therefore showing how exclusion is a part of belonging. Similarly orwell’s 1984 conveys the message of how exclusion is a large part of understanding belonging. This is mostly illustrated by the characterisation of the protagonist, Winston, and his alter ego, Julia. Winston’s morality for the freedom of individuals is portrayed in the first chapter, shaped by the repetitious diary entries of “down with...
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