Romeo: Static Character

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  • Topic: Romeo and Juliet, Characters in Romeo and Juliet, Mercutio
  • Pages : 2 (476 words )
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  • Published : May 2, 2011
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Throughout the play we see that Romeo’s impulsive decisions land him in onerous situations. His capricious behavior is demonstrated through his rash love when he immediately moves on, without remorse or second thoughts, from Rosaline to Juliet whom he falls in love with instantly after laying eyes on her. Prior to seeing Juliet, Romeo talks about his infatuation with Rosaline, and the torment he suffers when he finds she does not love him back. Upon searching for her at the Capulet’s party, sees Juliet, when he says, “Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night,” (i.V.51). His immediate transition between lovers proves that his love for Juliet was impulsive and irrational. When Romeo hears of Juliet’s death, he says to himself, “Well Juliet, I will lie with thee tonight. Let’s see for means.” (V.i.34). His first thought is that if Juliet is dead, he must dies too. Without considering any other options or going to Friar Laurence for further details, he acts on a whim and kills himself, when in reality Juliet isn’t actually dead. These actions prove Romeo as a static character because throughout the course of the play, when his love for Juliet ignites, comes to an end, and in other situations, Romeo does not think his decisions through and acts on impulse.

Romeo is in love with the idea of being in love. Instead of using his head, Romeo only defines love with his eyes and heart. When it comes to emotions, Romeo is ardent about being in love. Because he unconditionally loves many characters throughout the play, it causes major conflicts. This makes him static because during the play he always lets love, and other emotions, get in the way and never learns from his mistakes.When Tybalt wants a duel Romeo says, “To such a greeting. Villain am I none,” (III.i.63) and backs down. After Tybalt starts to insult Romeo, Mercutio gets in between them and is then killed by Tybalt. “Now, Tybalt, take the ‘villain’ back again...
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