Romeo Love Is Fickle

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Persuasive Paragraph Number One

In Shakespeare’s Play, “Romeo and Juliet”, Romeo’s love is expressed as fickle. It is in fact true that his love is fickle because of his romantic feelings for both Rosaline and Juliet. Before Romeo had met Juliet, he had loved Rosaline. In the play, it is described that Romeo is unconditionally in love with Rosaline. Rosaline, however, chooses to turn him down; Romeo says: “She hath forsworn to love, and in that vow/Do I live dead that live to tell it now.” (Act 1, Scene 1, 214-215)  This is the source of his depression. Benvolio urges Romeo to sneak into the Capulet ball where, he claims, Rosaline will look like "a crow" alongside the other beautiful women. Romeo agrees to go, but doubts Benvolio's judgement. Romeo explains that he only wants to go to the ball because his only love, Rosaline will be there.

“I’ll go along, no such sight to be shown, But to rejoice in splendor of mine own.” (Act 1, Scene 2, 102-103)

After Romeo sees Juliet his feelings suddenly change. He claims that he has never loved or saw anyone as beautiful before he had seen Juliet: "Did my heart love 'til now? Forswear it, sight / for I ne'er saw true beauty 'til this night” (Act 1, Scene 5, 51-52) Romeo love is fickle because even after having his heart broken by Rosaline, he can still fall in love with Juliet so quickly. His love changes in an instant from Rosaline to Juliet. Before Romeo had thought that Rosaline was the most beautiful woman in the world, but after seeing Juliet he had thought that Rosaline was no longer beautiful. Most often people forget that Romeo had another love interest before Juliet. Because Romeo keeps changing his mind on who he loves, he love is considered fickle.
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